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CFAIWS1 - Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is working with people from another country or culture.

You might use this when working with people from a different country or diverse cultures who were born, educated, work or live here or who live or work abroad. When working with individuals or groups from one or more countries or
Cultures. When working in the private, public or not-for-profit sectors. When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work. When working with people inside or outside your organisation, face to face or using telephone, letter or email. When working with your manager or colleagues at the same or a different level than you, customers, clients or students, as a member of a multicultural team, as a member of a UK-based or international project team or collaboratively with non-UK partners when working with people long term or for one-off transactions to provide a service, information or advice or to carry out research.

The benefits and business case for doing this effectively are improved cohesive workforce relations between people from different countries and diverse cultures. Reduction in workplace racism and workplace stress and the wasted time, potential and assets resulting from it. Work produced by individuals and teams that meets or exceeds work requirements. Services delivered
sensitively and appropriately to all users. Service users satisfied with the service they have received. Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Explore your own value-base and expectations and how they are viewed by others, challenge your own and other people’s stereotypes and prejudices, communicate and work with others in ways that maximise individual performance and organisational productivity.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

Performance criteria

  • Recognise your own values, beliefs and cultural conventions and how they affect your perceptions and expectations in work situations
  • Actively seek to understand how your values, beliefs, cultural conventions and language use appear to other people
  • Base your opinions of people on your own interaction with them rather than on common perception, stereotypes, their accent or their dress
  • Challenge and adapt your own assumptions about the behaviour of people from different countries or diverse cultures
  • Challenge any stereotypes, prejudice or racism expressed by other people about yourself or others
  • Communicate in ways that can be understood by the people from the countries or cultures you are working with
  • Make enough time and effort and respond flexibly and positively so that your working practice engages and includes people from different countries or diverse cultures
  • Work in ways that balance other people’s expectations of you with the need to achieve organisational objectives
  • Deal constructively with situations that you find unclear or confusing
    when working with people from different countries or diverse cultures and maintain respect for individuals when you are unable to understand or empathise with their views or behaviour
  • Reflect on the impact of your behaviour and use of language when working with people from different countries or diverse cultures and adapt them to improve results in the future

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • How differences and similarities between your own and other people’s cultural behaviour may change or affect attitudes, expectations, communication and working practices (for example timekeeping, timescales, decision-making processes, perceptions of status and role, attitudes to men or women, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion and levels of hierarchy and formality)
  • How your own and other people’s values and beliefs may change as culture evolves or you and they are exposed to a different culture (for example by growing up in a country that is not your or their parents’ or grandparents’ native country, by living or working abroad, by living or working with people from different countries and cultures)
  • How to base your opinions and actions towards people from a different country or diverse culture on them as an individual and not on common perception, stereotypes, prejudice or old information (for example by asking the person, by judging them on their work, by getting to know them)
  • How cultural stereotypes can be reinforced by the way you and others behave and present information about your country or culture

Communication and language

  • How your use of language, body language, gestures and tone of voice may appear to people from different countries or diverse cultures and how theirs may affect your perceptions of them
  • The possible results of a lack of understanding or ineffective communication tools (for example disagreements, misunderstanding about expectations, potential conflict)
  • The politeness conventions used by yourself and the people from the countries or cultures you are working with and how these may affect people’s perceptions of each other (for example apparent rudeness caused by non-use, apparent insincerity caused by over-use of ‘please’ and ‘thank you’)
  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you (for example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language,
    gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures anddiagrams, learning their language.) the challenges in communicating with people from another culture who share the same first language with you (For example differences in vocabulary, spelling, accent, expressions and directness.)

Working relationships

  • How finding shared ground can contribute to good working relationships between people from different countries or diverse cultures

Training and support

  • What training or support to develop your skills for working with people from different countries or diverse cultures might be relevant to you and who to approach to access it (For example language awareness training, language training, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages),
    EFL (English as a Foreign Language), intercultural skills training, training courses about specific cultures)

Equality laws and regulation

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with people from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them (For example equality legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice)
  • What to do or who to approach if you or a colleague feel unfairly treated
    at work (For example relevant manager, trade union representative)

CFAIWS2 – Build working relationships with people from different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is building working relationships with people from another country or culture.

You might do this:

  • When building medium term or long term working relationships with people from one organisation or many.
  • When building working relationships with people from a different country or culture who were born, educated or work here or who work abroad.
  • When working in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.
  • When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work.
  • When researching or developing a product or service, hosting an overseas group or arranging overseas visits, working on mergers and acquisitions, networking or building a relationship for the future, working for a client or on transnational projects.
  • When working at board or operational levels with partnerships, joint ventures, franchises or multinationals or with people in the supply chain or route to market.

The benefits and business case for doing this effectively:

  • Globalisation makes intercultural understanding a business imperative.
  • Future opportunities for the people and organisations involved.
  • Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Action plan ways to address cultural differences, commit sufficient time and energy, communicate effectively, agree mutually-beneficial working practices, deal proactively with misunderstandings.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

This unit covers specific aspects of building working relationships with people from different countries or diverse cultures. The general skills needed to work with people from different countries or diverse cultures are covered in the following unit.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards).

Performance criteria

  • Identify the differences and similarities in language and culture and political and historical factors that may impact on the relationship and plan how to address them.
  • Find out which people you need to work with at all stages of the relationship to meet the cultural expectations of your own and the other organisation(s).
  • Communicate in ways that can be understood by the people from the countries or cultures that you are dealing with.
  • Find out about and use the common courtesies and greetings used by the people from the countries or cultures you are working with.
  • Recognise how your use of language, body language, gestures and tone of voice may appear to people from different countries or diverse cultures and of how theirs may affect your perceptions of them.
  • Create opportunities and invest sufficient time and energy into developing productive business, personal and social relationships with the people from the countries or cultures you are dealing with.
  • Agree to decision making, communication and working processes that meet your own and other organisations’ needs and take account of the key differences and similarities in working practices, values and attitudes of the countries or cultures involved.
  • Minimise disruption for the organisations and people involved by dealing proactively with things that go wrong with the relationship and maintain respect for individuals when you are unable to understand or empathise with their views or behaviour.

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • How to base your opinions and actions towards people from another country or culture on them as an individual and not on common perception, stereotypes, prejudice or old information. (for example asking the person, judging them on their work, getting to know them.)
  • Key political and historical factors that affect the country or culture you are working with. (for example past or current partnership or conflict, shared policies, elections or political unrest.)
  • The laws, frameworks, working practices and differences and similarities in culture and language between your own and the country or culture you are working with. (for example key holidays, working hours, traditions such as gift giving and attitudes to business email, finance and borrowing.)
  • How differences and similarities between your own and other people’s cultural behaviour and expectations may change or affect business ethics, decision making, communication, financial transactions, working procedures and relationship-building. (for example timekeeping, timescales, decision-making processes, perceptions of status and role, attitudes to men or women, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion and levels of formality and hierarchy.)

Communication and language

  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you. (for example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)
  • The challenges in communicating with people from a different culture who share the same first language with you. (For example differences in vocabulary, spelling, accent, expressions and directness.)

Training and support

  • What to consider when deciding whether to use or develop your own or other people’s cultural, local or community knowledge, interpersonal skills, language awareness or foreign language skills or whether to use
    external services or specialists. (For example quality and accuracy required, cost of buying in a service compared with cost of training staff, actual competence of people involved, long-term benefit of having skills in-house.)
  • The different consultancy services and specialists that might be useful to you, their cost, likely accuracy and how to access and use them. (For example translators, interpreters, cultural or international communication specialists, language trainers.)

Working relationships

  • How finding shared ground can contribute to good working relationships between people from different countries or cultures.
  • How important it is to be sensitive to how your behaviour may be perceived by people from different countries or diverse cultures. (For example breakdown in relationships, loss of business.)
  • How cooperation and competition can affect organisational relationships and to what extent these will benefit your organisation and the relationship as a whole.

Equality laws and regulations

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with people from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them. (For example equality legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice.)

CFAIWS3 – Appoint people from different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is appointing people from another country or culture.

You might do this:

  • When employing or promoting people, recruiting volunteers or engaging people on a freelance or contract basis within the UK or abroad.
  • When employing one or more people from another country or culture for the first time or when adding to the number of people from other countries or cultures in your organisation.
  • When employing people from other countries or cultures whether they were born, educated or work here.
  • When employing people that are planning to stay for the long-term or planning to move to another country after a period of time.
  • When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work.
  • When working in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.
  • When you are responsible for the employment of people in the organisation.

The benefits and business case for doing this effectively

  • Access to a wider range of people with the right skills to do the job, who understand what they need to do and what is required of them.
  • A cohesive workforce whose members communicate effectively with each other and work productively together.
  • Potential for optimum short-term and long-term organisational effectiveness and higher productivity.
  • Compliance with recruitment laws.
  • Potential for inclusiveness and greater diversity within the workplace.
  • Reduced staff turnover.
  • Potential for greater innovation and creativity.
  • Potential for better staff morale and greater motivation.
  • Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Recruit or promote people with the required skills and language levels, arrange strategies for communication, build relationships with support organisations, induct and support new people, train and manage the perceptions of the wider workforce.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

This unit covers specific aspects of working with people from different countries and diverse cultures. The general skills needed to work with people from different countries or diverse cultures are covered in the following unit.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards)

The following units describe workforce planning and recruitment in more detail.

  • Plan what people the business needs (OP2 from Business Enterprise standards)
  • Plan the workforce (D4 from Management and Leadership standards)
  • Recruit people (OP3 from Business Enterprise standards)
  • Recruit, select and keep colleagues (D3 from Management and leadership standards)

Performance criteria

  • Use selection procedures that do not require more skills than are needed to carry out the job and that recognise experience gained in other countries.
  • Base your decisions to employ or promote people on their potential to do the job rather than on accent or dress, stereotypes, prejudice, old information or common perception of their skills and work ethics.
  • Build relationships with, and signpost to, organisations that can support people from the countries or cultures you are employing.
  • Identify and remove barriers that may stop people from different countries or diverse cultures working effectively.
  • Induct, train and support people from different countries or diverse cultures to help them adapt and maximise their productivity, effectiveness and understanding.
  • Manage the expectations and perceptions of existing workers and arrange for any necessary training or ongoing support that is needed to achieve this.
  • Implement communication strategies that are right for the organisation and that take account of the diversity of language and culture of the people within it.
  • Apply equality of opportunity to all workers and communicate this in ways they can all engage with.

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • How differences and similarities in the cultural behaviour of people from different countries or diverse cultures may change or affect the conduct of job interviews, company dynamics and expected working practices. (For example timekeeping, timescales, decision making processes, perceptions of status and role, attitudes to men or women, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion, levels of hierarchy and formality.)

Communication and language

  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you. (For example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)
  • The benefits, use and drawbacks of different communication methods. (For example translation, interpreting, signage, English language training for new workers, foreign language training for existing workers, protocols for email and remote working.)
  • The terms and phrases necessary to carry out particular jobs register from one language to the other.

Recruitment, employment and promotion

  • How to assess levels of English and match them against those needed for productive working throughout the organisation and within specific jobs.
  • How to operate selection and promotion procedures so that they are fair to people from different countries or diverse cultures. (For example translating job descriptions and person specifications or writing them in simple English, recognising that applicants may use interview communication conventions from their country when answering
    questions, clarifying questions, putting them in context for the specific job or probing applicants’ answers to elicit actual skills and experience, recognising experience, qualifications and references from other countries, adapting interview methods to the level of English of the applicant.)
  • Ways to make employment in your organisation more accessible to people from different countries or diverse cultures. (For example allowing
    larger blocks of holiday to visit relatives, allowing flexible working time to allow time for prayer, authorising leave for holy days, organising family or social events.)
  • The role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practiceways to meet different people’s cultural needs whilst maintaining fairness for all. (For example expecting time allowed off for prayer to be made up, allowing larger blocks of holiday for all.)

Training and support

  • What to consider when deciding whether to use or develop your own or other people’s cultural, local or community knowledge, interpersonal skills, language awareness or foreign language skills or whether to use external services or specialists. (For example quality and accuracy required, cost of buying in a service compared with cost of training staff, actual competence of people involved, long-term benefit of having skills in-house.)
  • The range of language and cultural awareness training and development that is available, how to encourage its use, where and how to access it and the benefits for different people within the organisation such as new and existing workers and managers. (For example language awareness training, language training, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), EFL (English as a Foreign Language), intercultural skills training, training courses about specific cultures.)
  • The benefits of mentoring, coaching and work-shadowing, what they involve and how to implement them with people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • How to find and make accessible or signpost to the information new people from different countries or diverse cultures need to help them work effectively. (For example the requirements of the job, the organisation’s culture, the practicalities of everyday living such as registering with a doctor, getting a national insurance number or opening a bank account, the expectations of the community and the laws of the country in which they are working.)
  • The local and national organisations that can support the people you are recruiting. (For example community groups, trade unions, other employee representative groups and informal networks.)

Working relationships

  • The challenges and barriers that may affect the success in the workplace of newly-arrived people from different countries or diverse cultures. (For example stress caused by relocation, other people’s reactions, not understanding what they are supposed to be doing, not feeling accepted in the organisation or community.)
  • ways to improve working relationships between existing workers and new workers from different countries or diverse cultures. (For example giving positive messages about employment of new workers through
    organisational practices and your own behaviour, encouraging new workers to learn the language, integrating new workers with existing workers from the start, adopting a mentoring or ‘buddying’ system, encouraging new workers to integrate, assuring existing and new
    workers of organisational processes that are fair to all, allocating time for people to get to know each other, organising sports or social events.)

Equality laws and regulations

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with people from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them. (For example equality
    legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice.)

CFAIWS4 – Manage a multicultural team

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is managing a multicultural team.

You might do this:

  • When managing a multicultural or international team made up of people from two or more different countries or cultures in the UK or abroad.
  • When managing people from other countries or cultures whether they were born, educated, or work here.
  • When managing a team within a department, across departments within an organisation or across organisations.
  • When managing a team face to face or remotely whether you have direct line management responsibility or not.
  • When working in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.
  • When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work.

The benefits and business case of doing this effectively

  • An effective team that works to the desired quality and achieves team objectives to required timelines.
  • An effective and cohesive team that values and supports all team members.
  • Reduction in workplace racism and workplace stress and the wasted time, potential and assets resulting from it.
  • A team that is managed fairly and efficiently.
  • A team that operates and solves problems in a more creative and innovative way.
  • A team that functions with greater synergy and which enables all team members to contribute to their full potential.
  • A team whose members communicate effectively with one another.
  • Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Develop a shared team culture, encourage mutual respect, equality and inclusiveness, make sure communication, work processes and training can be followed by all team members, deal with conflict and racism.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

This unit covers specific aspects of working with people from different countries or diverse cultures. The general skills needed to work with people from
different countries or diverse cultures are covered in the following unit.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards)

The following units describe team management and team development in more detail.

  • Make sure people can do their work (OP5 from Business Enterprise standards)
  • Allocate and check work in your team (D5 from Management and
    Leadership standards)
  • Allocate and monitor the progress and quality of work in your area of responsibility (D6 from Management and Leadership standards)
  • Develop people’s skills (OP6 from Business Enterprise standards)
  • Provide learning opportunities for colleagues (D7 from Management and Leadership standards)
  • Promote equality of opportunity and diversity in your area or responsibility (B11 from Management and Leadership standards)
  • Deal with workplace problems or disputes (OP7 from Business
    Enterprise standards)

Performance criteria

  • Expect team members to respect each other’s values, beliefs and cultural conventions and to value the contributions of all team members.
  • Motivate the team to work as a team, explore common ground and
    achieve an atmosphere of mutual acceptance and purpose.
  • Develop a working culture that maximises productivity while balancing the cultural needs and expectations of all team members.
  • Make sure all team members are inducted into the working culture and
    have the skills and encouragement to continually assess their interaction with their colleagues from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Manage the team in a way that meets team objectives while showing flexibility towards team members’ cultural needs.
  • Use the skills, experiences and contributions of all team members to the
    benefit of the team when planning and carrying out work.
  • Make sure inter-team communication is carried out in ways that can be understood and applied by all team members.
  • Apply equality of opportunity to all team members and make sure no
    team members are excluded from any work-based or non work-based team activities because of race or cultural background.
  • Challenge any stereotypes, prejudice or racism expressed by other people about yourself or others in the team.
  • Get the support you need to resolve issues caused by intercultural
    tension or misunderstanding.

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • How differences and similarities between team members’ cultural behaviour may change or affect team dynamics and working practices. (For example timekeeping, timescales, decision-making processes, perceptions of status and role, attitudes to men or women, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion and levels of hierarchy and formality.)
  • How people’s values and beliefs may change as their own culture evolves or they are exposed to a different culture. (For example by growing up in a country that is not their parent’s or grandparent’s native country, by living or working abroad, by living or working with people from different countries and cultures.)

Communication and language

  • How team members’ use of language, body language, gestures and tone of voice may appear to people from different countries or diverse cultures and may affect their perceptions of each other.
  • How team members who are fluent but not native speakers of a team language can still frequently construe different connotations,meanings of words or concepts derived from their own culture.
  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you. (For example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)
  • The challenges in communicating with people from different countries or diverse cultures who share the same first language with you. (For example differences in vocabulary, spelling, accent, expressions and directness.)

Training and support

  • What to consider when deciding whether to use or develop your own or other people’s cultural, local or community knowledge, interpersonal skills, language awareness or foreign language skills or whether to use external services or specialists. (For example quality and accuracy required, cost of buying in a service compared with cost of training staff, actual competence of people involved, long-term benefit of having skills
    in-house.)
  • The range of language and cultural awareness training and development that is available, how to encourage its use, where and how to access it and the benefits for different people within the team. (For example language awareness training, language training, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), EFL (English as a Foreign Language), intercultural skills training, training courses about specific cultures.)
  • The benefits of mentoring, coaching and work-shadowing, what they involve and how to implement them with people from different countries or cultures.
  • Where your knowledge of multicultural management ends, when you need to seek advice or support for yourself or your team members and where to get it. (For example community groups, self-help groups, intercultural counselling, intercultural mediators.)

Team management

  • What you should consider when developing a working culture. (For example decision making processes, working methods, co-ordination and communication norms.)
  • The benefits of encouraging team members to share their intercultural knowledge and learn from and support each other. (For example more inclusive working practices, better understanding of each other’s needs.)
  • The complexities involved in managing a multicultural team and what practices can cause disagreements, misunderstanding or conflict. (For example lack of language skills, team socialising that excludes some team members because of cultural background, team members speaking different languages so that other team members feel left out, non- transparent processes that lead to a feeling of unfairness, use of humour which reinforces stereotypes, religious practices.)
  • Ways to meet different team members’ cultural needs whilst maintaining fairness for all. (For example scheduling work to allow time for prayer but expecting that time to be made up, allowing larger blocks of holiday for all.)
  • The areas of your work where you will need to take team members’ different cultural perspectives into account. (For example developing work processes, giving instructions and feed back, discipline and grievance, team development, coaching and training.)
  • Ways to improve working relationships between team members. (For example managing conflicts or disagreements, teasing out common values from seemingly diverse views, building a respect for diversity, breaking down segregation between groups, assuring all team members of team processes that are fair to all, allocating time for people to get to know each other, organising sports or social events.)

Equality laws and regulations

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with people from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them. (For example equality legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice.)
  • What to do or who to approach if you or one of your team feel unfairly treated at work. (For example relevant manager, trade union
    representative.)

CFAIWS5 – Manage delivery of a service to people from different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is managing service delivery to people from another country or culture.

You might do this:

  • When managing service delivery to people from one or more different countries or cultures.
  • When managing service delivery to people from other countries or cultures whether they were born, educated or work here, have just arrived in the country or live abroad.
  • When managing service delivery for a free or paid-for service, that is delivered inside or outside your organisation and interacts with users face-to-face, by telephone, letter or email.
  • When working in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.
  • When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work.
  • When providing a service, information or advice, carrying out market research, working collaboratively with non-UK partners to provide a service or working in education with students from other countries or cultures.

The benefits and business case for doing this effectively

  • Services are delivered sensitively and appropriately to all users.
  • People are satisfied with the service they have received.
  • Organisational performance and reputation improves.
  • Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Encourage the others involved in service delivery to respect customers’ cultural conventions, deal with stereotypes, deliver a consistent high standard of
service to all service users, adapt service delivery practices, deal with intercultural tension or misunderstanding.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

This unit covers specific aspects of managing service delivery to people from different countries and cultures. The general skills needed to work with people from different countries or diverse cultures are covered in the following unit.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards)

The units below may be useful for those involved in service delivery.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards)
  • Recognise diversity when delivering customer service (23 from Customer Service standards)

Performance criteria

  • Expect those involved in service delivery to respect and understand service users’ values, beliefs and cultural conventions and to value them as customers.
  • Identify any language skills needed and where they can be sourced most effectively.
  • Encourage those involved in service delivery to continually assess their interaction with service users from different countries or diverse cultures and make sure they have the skills to do so.
  • Encourage those involved in service delivery to respond flexibly and positively and solve problems so that the service meets the needs of service users from different countries and diverse cultures.
  • Maintain the same high standard of service for each service user.
  • Check that service users are satisfied with the service and resolve differences between their needs and the service offered so that it attracts and does not discriminate against the people you are providing services for.
  • Challenge any stereotypes, prejudice or racism expressed by other people about yourself or others.
  • Deal with things that go wrong that are caused by different cultural expectations, miscommunication, misunderstanding or racial tension and minimise their impact on ongoing service delivery, getting support when you need it.

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • How differences and similarities between the cultural behaviour of service users and those involved in service delivery may change or affect the service delivery processes that are needed. (for example timekeeping, timescales, decision making processes, levels of customer service, attitudes to men or women, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, attitudes to emotion and levels of formality and hierarchy.)
  • Where to get information about different countries or diverse cultures and how to evaluate that information. (for example business associates, embassies, chambers of commerce, cultural organisations, market research, export agents, trade journals, marketing specialists, government departments, migrant support organisations and community organisations, relevant web sites, local agents.)

Communication and language

  • The different politeness conventions used by those involved in service delivery and service users and how these may affect their perceptions of each other. (For example apparent rudeness caused by non- use, apparent insincerity caused by over-use of ‘please’ and ‘thank you’.)
  • How the use of language, body language, gestures and tone of voice of those involved in service delivery and service users may appear to each other and may affect their perceptions of each other.
  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you. (For example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)
  • The challenges in communicating with people from different countries or diverse cultures who share the same first language with you. (For example differences in vocabulary, spelling, accent, expressions and directness.)

Training and support

  • The benefits of mentoring, coaching and work-shadowing, what they involve and how to implement them with people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • What to consider when deciding whether to use or develop your own or other people’s cultural, local or community knowledge, interpersonal skills, language awareness or foreign language skills or whether to use external services or specialists. (For example quality and accuracy required, cost of buying in a service compared with cost of training staff, actual competence of people involved, long-term benefit of having skills in-house.)
  • The different consultancy services and specialists that might be useful to you, their cost, likely accuracy and how to access and use them. (For example translators, interpreters, cultural or international communication specialists, brand consultants.)
  • The range of language and cultural awareness training and development that is available, how to encourage its use, where to access it and the benefits for different people involved in service delivery. (For example language awareness training, language training, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), EFL (English as a Foreign Language), intercultural skills training, training courses about specific cultures.)

Service delivery

  • The service ethics of the countries or cultures you are dealing with
  • The possible results of a lack of understanding or ineffective communication tools. (For example customer dissatisfaction, disagreements, misunderstanding about expectations, potential conflict.)
  • The legal, technical and communication needs of the service users from different countries or diverse cultures you work with and how service delivery practices, processes and policies can be adapted to accommodate them.
  • Ways to resolve issues between your staff and service users from different countries or diverse cultures and who to approach if you cannot resolve them yourself.

Equality laws and regulations

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with service users from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them. (For example equality legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice.)
  • What to do or who to approach if you, one of your team or a service user feel unfairly treated. (For example relevant manager, trade union representative.)

CFAIWS6 – Develop new markets with different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

This unit is for anybody from any country or culture who is developing new markets with another country or culture.

You might do this:

  • When developing new markets with people of a different culture within the UK or abroad.
  • When developing new markets with people from any country or culture whether they were born, educated or work here or are have just arrived in the country.
  • When working in the public, private, non-profit or community sectors.
  • When working in voluntary, aid or humanitarian work.
  • When making one-off or ongoing transactions.
  • When widening your range of products or services, trying to find new customers for your existing products or services, opening an additional office or new organisation elsewhere or working on a merger, acquisition or offshore outsourcing.

The benefits and business case of doing this effectively

  • New markets or customers for your products or services.
  • Less dependency on current market(s).
  • Reduced business risk by entering stronger or more lucrative market(s).
  • Increased sales or number of users for your products or services.
  • Greater market visibility.
  • Wider range of products or services.
  • Better knowledge of competitors and more sustainable market presence.
  • Strengthened diversity and equality policies and procedures.

Identify the cultural and product or service expectations of people in new markets, respond to the needs of markets, test your ideas, develop processes to implement them, recognise opportunities for the future.

These standards describe working with people from different countries or diverse cultures in ways that promote open and respectful interaction, better understanding and improved performance.

This unit covers specific aspects of working with different cultures. The general skills needed to work with people from different countries or diverse cultures
are covered in the following unit.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures (1 from Intercultural Working standards)

The units below describe the technical aspects of international trade.

  • Explore markets abroad (WB6 from Business Enterprise standards)
  • Import or export products or services (BD13 from Business Enterprise standards)

Performance criteria

  • Respond effectively to tips about opportunities in new markets or locations and make and use personal contacts and other links to gather information.
  • Find out about the actual current preferences, values, sensitivities, cultural expectations and buying patterns of the people in your chosen market.
  • Recognise what language skills are needed and where they can be sourced most effectively.
  • Respond positively to the needs of the market and use products or services that will attract and not discriminate against the people you are providing them to.
  • Test or pilot your products or services in ways that meet the expectations of the country or culture in your chosen market.
  • Use processes and procedures that take account of the key differences and similarities in working practices, laws, regulations, values and attitudes of the countries or cultures involved and the needs of your organisation.
  • Recognise opportunities to develop products or services that are of value to existing and new markets.
  • Recognise ideas from different countries or cultures that may help you to be more innovative in your international business strategy and operations.
  • Overcome barriers to international business development due to poor market knowledge and communication problems.
  • Manage knowledge transfer between your organisation and its clients
    and partners to promote sustainable relationships and growth.

Knowledge and understanding

Cultural influences

  • Why it is important not to base your decisions on common perception, stereotypes, prejudice or old information.
  • Key political and historical factors that affect the country or culture you are working with. (for example past or current partnership or conflict, shared policies, elections or political unrest.).
  • The preferences and cultural and language differences and similarities of the people in your chosen market.
  • How differences and similarities between your own and others’ cultural behaviour may change or affect the financial transactions, contracts and procedures that you need to carry out. (for example timekeeping, timescales, decision making processes, attitudes to men or women, gender, communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion and levels of formality and hierarchy.)
  • Where to get information about different countries or diverse cultures and how to evaluate that information. (for example business associates, embassies, chambers of commerce, cultural organisations, market research, export agents, trade journals, marketing specialists, government departments, migrant support organisations, relevant web sites, local agents.)

Communication and language

  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you (For example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, learning the language concepts for expressing numbers, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)

Training and support

  • What to consider when deciding whether to use or develop your own or other people’s cultural, local or community knowledge, interpersonal skills, language awareness or foreign language skills or whether to use external services or specialists. (For example quality and accuracy required, cost of buying in a service compared with cost of training staff, actual competence of people involved, long-term benefit of having skills in-house.)
  • the different consultancy services and specialists that might be useful to you, their cost, likely accuracy and how to access and use them (For example translators, interpreters, cultural or international communication specialists, brand consultants.)
  • The range of language and cultural awareness training and development available, how to encourage its use, where and how to access it and the benefits for the different people involved in developing new markets. (For example language awareness training, language training, ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages), EFL (English as a Foreign Language), intercultural skills training, training courses about specific cultures.)

Market development

  • Why it is important to develop products or services that appeal specifically to people from the countries or cultures in your chosen market.
  • What might affect the development of new markets in other countries. (For example market expectation of products or services, laws and regulations, location, technological capacity, distribution channels, financial environment, politics.)
  • How to impartially review your products or services to see if they need translating or tailoring to appeal to people from different countries or cultures or if new products or services need to be created.
  • How to adapt your products or services (name and content), packaging, positioning, price, marketing materials, marketing methods and sales techniques to appeal to your chosen market and its distribution channels.

Equality laws and regulations

  • The laws, regulations and company guidelines that dictate how you are expected to behave with people from different countries or diverse cultures, how to apply them in relation to your work and where to get further information and advice about them. (For example equality legislation, company policies and values, codes of practice.)

CFAIWS7 – Work with people from different countries or diverse cultures

Overview

The new National Occupational Standards for Working with People from Different Countries or Diverse Cultures have been approved since the summer of 2008 and comprise the following generic units.

  • Develop your skills to work effectively with people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Build working relationships with people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Appoint people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Manage a multicultural team.
  • Manage delivery of a service to people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Develop new markets with people from different countries or diverse cultures.

Sector Skills Councils and Standards Setting Bodies who wish to include some element of intercultural working in their standards can import and tailor one or more of these units in the usual way.

There is wide recognition by employers of the importance of effective intercultural working across the UK workforce and abroad. Intercultural working can mean, but does not assume, that a different language is spoken and can apply equally to working with people from English-speaking and non-English- speaking nations. It also applies to effective working within the vast array of multicultural workforces that can be found within the UK. Effective intercultural working is something that is learned over a period of time through experience and reflection. Some people learn more quickly and comfortably than others while some may never progress very far because of unshakeable predispositions.

Performance criteria

  • Communicate in ways that can be understood by the people from the countries or cultures you are working with.
  • Work in ways that balance other people’s expectations of you with the need to achieve organisational objectives.
  • Make enough time and effort and respond flexibly and positively so that your working practice engages and includes people from different countries or diverse cultures.
  • Deal constructively with situations that you find unclear or confusing when working with people from different countries or diverse cultures and maintain respect for individuals when you are unable to understand or empathise with their views or behaviour.

Knowledge and understanding

  • How your use of language, body language, gestures and tone of voice may appear to people from different countries or diverse cultures and how theirs’ may affect your perceptions of them.
  • Ways to minimise misunderstanding and improve communication with people with a different first language to you (for example taking the time to listen closely to what they are really saying, learning the conventions for introductions and greetings, not using your own fluency as a way to overpower others, learning some simple phrases in their language, gesturing, avoiding idioms, explaining acronyms, using pictures and diagrams, learning their language.)
  • The challenges in communicating with people from another culture who share the same first language with you. (for example differences in vocabulary, spelling, accent, expressions and directness.)
  • That people from different countries or diverse cultures will have different attitudes, expectations and service ethics than those you are used to. (for example different timekeeping, timescales, decision-making processes, perceptions of status and role, attitudes to men and women,
    communication styles and conventions, business relationships, business meeting conventions, attitudes to emotion, levels of hierarchy and formality.)
  • How to base your opinions and actions towards people from a 8 different country or diverse culture on them as an individual and not on common perception, stereotypes, prejudice or old information. (for example asking
    the person, judging them on their work, getting to know them.)