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CFAINTA1 - Prepare for interpreting assignments

Overview

This unit is about preparing for professional interpreting assignments. This involves establishing the nature of assignments and considering whether you have the right This unit is about preparing for professional interpreting assignments. This involves establishing the nature of assignments and considering whether you have the right skills. You must be able to use a range of information sources to prepare for assignments and must plan for any use of equipment. You must be fully aware of the role of the skills. You must be able to use a range of information sources to prepare for assignments and must plan for any use of equipment. You must be fully aware of the role of the professional interpreter and the principles of professional practice.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages and who would like either to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter.

Performance criteria

When you get a new interpreting assignment, you must show that:

  • You identify:
    • the subject matter and purpose of the assignment
    • the level of language and interpreting skills required
    • the mode of interpreting to be used: consecutive or
      simultaneous/whispered
  • you do not accept any assignment which is beyond your competence
  • you agree contract details, including location, equipment, timescales, insurance and payment
  • if appropriate, you request a briefing session and sight of documents to be used in advance of the assignment
  • you explain the principles of professional practice if unethical demands are made on you
  • you plan appropriately so that you will be able to deal with:
    • the type and complexity of the assignment
    • domain-specific requirements
    • likely cultural differences and language needs
    • any special requirements, including the need for equipment and the positioning of the user(s) and yourself
    • the likely requirements and expectations of your client and user(s)
  • you use relevant sources of information to prepare for the assignment
  • you compile and maintain a glossary of terminology

Knowledge and understanding

  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for your first language; and level 4 for your other language(s) (see the Listening/ Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the process of interpreting from one language into another and how to overcome the impact of the difference between languages
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the planning of the interpreting assignment
  • the modes of consecutive and simultaneous/whispered interpreting
  • techniques to anticipate the type and the degree of difficulty of the assignment and the client’s and users’ needs
  • techniques to deliver effective communication between source and target language users
  • the role of the interpreter and the principles of professional conduct, specifically the need to:
    • disclose any information, including conflict of interest which may make you unsuitable for an assignment
    • be impartial, maintain integrity and professionalism
    • treat all information you receive in the course of your duties as confidential, unless required to disclose by law
    • respect the ethics and the working practices of other professions
  • contract negotiation and agreement, including time scales, payment and professional indemnity as well as third party insurance
  • techniques to research and verify general and domain-specific terminology
  • techniques to compile and maintain glossaries of terminology
  • sources of general and specialist information to assist with assignments, e.g. internet, leaflets, video, glossaries and technical journals

CFAINTA2 – Extend existing skills to prepare for interpreting assignments

Overview

This unit is about advanced preparation for interpreting assignments, building on your existing skills. This involves establishing the nature of interpreting assignments, reviewing requirements against your existing knowledge and skills, and planning how you will acquire any new knowledge and skills.

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for A2 include those set for A1.

The unit is recommended for people who have professional interpreting skills and who would like either to develop or to benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

Extend existing skills to prepare for interpreting assignments

  • you identify the degree of difficulty and sensitivity of the assignment
  • you draw on your existing knowledge to prepare for the assignment
  • you establish the need for further background information and whether there are areas of knowledge on which you need to expand prior to the assignment
  • you plan how you will obtain the information which you require to prepare
  • you carry out your research and prepare for the assignment
  • you use your experience to anticipate any foreseeable scenarios and difficulties
  • you plan how you will create the best conditions for effective communication, anticipating:
    • complex language and interpreting demands
    • sensitive and/or emotional aspects of the interaction
    • high intellectual content of the interaction
    • the use of specialist equipment
    • special requirements of your clients and users

Knowledge and understanding

Extend existing skills to prepare for interpreting assignments

  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for both your first language and any other languages in which you interpret (see the Listening/Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • techniques to:
    • assess the client’s and users’ needs
    • anticipate the degree of difficulty of the assignment
    • assess the planning requirements for the interpreting assignment
    • anticipate foreseeable scenarios and difficulties
  • research methods and techniques relevant to planning for interpreting assignments

CFAINTB1 – Interpret one-way as a professional interpreter

Overview

This unit is about carrying out one-way interpreting assignments to a professional standard. You must be able to interpret presentations, talks and lectures accurately and fluently in the target language. You must be able to select and use the appropriate mode of interpreting for the occasion (i.e. consecutive or simultaneous/whispered) and fluently in the target language. You must be able to select and use the appropriate mode of interpreting for the occasion (i.e. consecutive or simultaneous/whispered) and handle the range of
formal, informal and colloquial registers. You must know how to use technology
(e.g. microphones, telephones or videophones) as appropriate.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages and would like either to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter.

Most commonly this unit is for those who interpret from one language into another, e.g. from French into English. It also applies to those interpreters who interpret from more than one language into a single target language. These are mostly conference interpreters who may interpret for example from Italian and French into English.

Performance criteria

When you interpret one-way, you must show that:

  • you interpret the meaning of a sustained presentation accurately in the target language
  • any omissions and inaccuracies are minor and do not significantly affect the meaning of the base message
  • your interpretation is sufficient to reflect the source language user’s:
    • register, attitude and tone as expressed through verbal and
      non-verbal communication
    • role and relationship with the target language user(s)
  • you interpret consecutively and/or simultaneously/whispered
  • you interpret factual information, concepts and opinions
  • you handle standard varieties of language and common regional dialects
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language
  • you support effective communication throughout the assignment and take action if communication breaks down
  • you explain your role as an interpreter when you arrive on site, if necessary
  • you use technology effectively and safely, such as microphone, video link and telephone
  • you adjust your style of communication to the medium and technology used
  • you take notes during consecutive interpreting, where required
  • your conduct is consistent with the principles of professional practice and your professional or registration body’s code of conduct

Knowledge and understanding

To interpret one-way effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of interpreting from one language into another
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for your first language; and level 4 for your other language(s) (see the Listening/ Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the delivery of one way interpreting assignments
  • register (frozen, formal, colloquial, informal, intimate) and the transfer of register from one language to the other
  • the interpreting modes of consecutive and simultaneous/whispered interpreting
  • techniques to deliver effective communication in a one-way presentation
  • techniques to manage the process of communication if it breaks down in one or more of the following ways:
    • you need to check on meaning
    • the degree of complexity, technicality or emotional charge is beyond your ability to deal with it
    • your position and/or that of the users hinders communication
    • the conduct of the presenter prevents you from interpreting effectively
    • the presenter is communicating too fast or too slowly
  • the role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practice
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret and how to work with professionals in their field
  • the use of technology, health and safety and how to trouble-shoot when there is a technical problem
  • techniques of taking notes when interpreting in consecutive mode

CFAINTB2 – Interpret one-way as an advanced professional interpreter

Overview

This unit is about carrying out one-way interpreting assignments to an advanced professional standard. You must be able to interpret presentations, talks or lectures with a high degree of accuracy and fluency in the target language. You must be able to handle the full range of language, including technical and complex language, and have a high degree of accuracy and fluency in the target language. You must be able to extend your knowledge and skills to an advanced professional standard.

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for B2 include those set for B1.

This unit is recommenced for people who have professional interpreting skills and who would like either to develop or to benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

When you interpret one-way, you must show that:

  • you interpret the meaning of a sustained presentation
    • precisely and fluently in the target language
    • maintaining a consistently accurate performance throughout the assignment
  • you reflect consistently the source language user’s:
    • register, tone and speed of production
    • intention, attitude, irony, sarcasm and innuendo
    • non-verbal communication
    • role and relationship with the audience
  • you interpret accurately:
    • factual information, concepts and opinions
    • complex language, specialist terminology and jargon
  • you reflect all major language variants, including standard language, regional dialects, and language used by speech/sign communities and individuals
  • you use appropriate equivalent language to convey the meaning of complex terminology and phrases, only if there is no direct equivalent in the target language
  • you support effective communication throughout the assignment and take action if communication breaks down
  • you take effective notes during consecutive interpreting, where required
  • you make effective use of the interpreting booth and technology, where appropriate
  • your conduct is consistent with the principles of professional practice and
    your professional or registration body’s code of conduct

Knowledge and understanding

To interpret one-way effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of interpreting from one language into another
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for both your first language and any other languages in which you interpret (see the Listening/Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the delivery of one way interpreting assignments
  • register (frozen, formal, colloquial, informal, intimate), the transfer of register from one language into another and techniques to use when the registers of the language users do not match each other
  • variation of the language and discourse of participants e.g. because of gender, age, class, background and profession
  • interpreting modes and techniques to deliver effective communication
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret
  • the role and ethics of the interpreter
  • techniques to take action if the process of communication breaks down in one or more of the following ways:
    • you need to check on meaning
    •  your position and/or that of the users or participants hinders communication
  • techniques of taking notes when interpreting in consecutive mode
  • the use of technology, health and safety requirements and how to troubleshoot when there is a technical problem

CFAINTC1 – Interpret two-way as a professional interpreter

Overview

This unit is about carrying out two-way interpreting assignments to a professional standard. This involves interpreting interactions between two or more language users in settings such as:

  1. one-to-one or small group meetings, for example a medical appointment or job interview
  2. group meetings, for example a public consultation with local residents or work meeting to review progress
  3. question and answer sessions after lectures and presentations

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages and who would like either to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter.

Performance criteria

When you interpret two-way, you must show that:

  • you interpret accurately the meaning expressed by users who are communicating with each other across two languages
  • your interpretation reflects the flow of communication between the source and target language users
  • any omissions and inaccuracies are minor and do not significantly affect the meaning of the base message in either language
  • your interpretation is sufficient to reflect the language users’:
    • register, attitude and tone as expressed through verbal and non-verbal communication
    • roles and relationships with each other
  • you interpret consecutively and/or simultaneously/whispered
  • you interpret factual information, concepts and opinions
  • you handle standard varieties of language and common regional dialects
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language
  • you support effective communication throughout the assignment and take action if communication breaks down
  • you explain your role as an interpreter when you arrive on site, if necessary
  • you use technology effectively and safely, such as microphone, video link and telephone
  • you adjust communication to the medium and technology used
  • you take notes during consecutive interpreting, where required
  • your conduct is consistent with the principles of professional practice and your professional or registration body’s code of conduct

Knowledge and understanding

To interpret two-way effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of interpreting from and into two languages
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for your first language; and level 4 for your other language(s) (see the Listening/ Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the delivery of two way interpreting assignments
  • register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate), the transfer of register from one language into the other and techniques to use when the registers of the language users do not match each other
  • the modes of consecutive and simultaneous/whispered interpreting
  • techniques to achieve effective communication in a two-way exchange
  • techniques to manage communication if it breaks down in one or more of the following ways:
    • you need to check on meaning
    • the degree of complexity, technicality or emotional charge is beyond your ability to deal with it
    • an apparent lack of understanding or misunderstanding hinders communication between the source and target language users
    • your position and/or that of the users hinders communication
    • the users’ conduct prevents you from interpreting effectively
    • the users are communicating too fast or too slowly
    • the users communicate all at once or fail to observe appropriate turn taking
  • the role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practice
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret and how to work with professionals in their field
  • the use of technology, health and safety requirements and how to troubleshoot when there is a technical problem
  • techniques of taking notes when interpreting in consecutive mode

CFAINTC2 – Interpret two-way as an advanced professional interpreter

Overview

This unit is about carrying out two-way interpreting assignments to an advanced professional standard. This involves interpreting the meaning expressed by people engaged in two-way interactions with a high degree of accuracy and fluency in the target language. You must be able to handle with ease a wide range of settings, such as:

  1. one-to-one and group meetings
  2. job interviews
  3. appointments with legal or medical practitioners
  4. complex negotiations e.g. political or commercial

You must be able to handle the full range of language, including technical and complex language, and have in-depth domain knowledge. You must be able to extend your knowledge and skills to an advanced professional standard. You must also be able to deal with highly charged emotional content, as may occur during a diplomatic emergency or a mental health consultation.

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for C2 include those set for C1.

The unit is recommended for people who have professional interpreting skills and who would like either to develop or to benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

When you interpret two-way, you must show that:

  • you interpret the meaning expressed by people engaged in two-way interaction
    •  precisely and fluently in both target languages
    • maintaining a consistently satisfactory performance throughout the assignment
  • your reflect both language users’
    • register, tone and speed of production
    • attitude, irony, sarcasm and innuendo
    • non-verbal communication
    • social and cultural norms
    • respective roles and relationships
  • you interpret
    • factual information, concepts and opinions
    • standard language and any regional or national dialects
    • complex language, specialist terms and jargon
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terminology and phrases, if there is no direct equivalent in the target language
  • your interpretation reflects the flow of communication between the source and target language users
  • you support effective communication throughout the assignment and take action if communication breaks down
  • you take effective notes during consecutive interpreting where required
  • you make effective use of the interpreting booth and any technology, where appropriate
  • your conduct is consistent with the principles of professional practice and
    your professional or registration body’s code of conduct

Knowledge and understanding

To interpret effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of interpreting from one language into another
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for both your first language and any other languages in which you interpret (see the Listening/Reception and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the delivery of two way interpreting
  • register (frozen, formal, colloquial, informal, intimate), the transfer of register from one language into the other and techniques to use when the registers of the language users do not match each other
  • interpreting modes and techniques to deliver effective communication between the language users of both languages
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret
  • the role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practice
  • what to do if the process of communication breaks down in one or more of the following ways:
    • you need to check on meaning
    • an apparent lack of understanding or a misunderstanding hinders communication between the source and target language users
    • your position and/or that of the users or participants hinders communication
    • the users’ conduct prevents you from interpreting effectively
    • the users communicate all at once or fail to observe appropriate turn taking
  • techniques of taking notes when interpreting in consecutive mode
  • the use of technology, health and safety requirements and how to troubleshoot when there is a technical problem

CFAINTD1 – Develop your performance as an interpreter

Overview

This unit is about developing your performance as an interpreter. This is expressed in two elements

  1. Evaluate your performance as an interpreter
  2. Plan and implement professional development

This involves reviewing your interpreting assignments and evaluating your performance and preparation. You must be able identify your strengths and weaknesses and create a personal development plan to maintain and develop your professional knowledge and skills.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages and who would like to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter.

Performance criteria

1. Evaluate your performance as an interpreter

  • You use commonly used concepts and criteria to review your preparation for and delivery of assignments
  • You evaluate the language you used during interpreting assignments in terms of:
    • Syntax
    • lexical choice
    • pronunciation and intonation/modulation
    • register
  • You review how accurately and fluently you processed the meaning of the source language message into the target language
  • You evaluate how well you managed assignments in terms of:
    • Your conduct, style and interaction with users
    • The approach you took to dealing with cultural expectations
    • The appropriateness of simultaneous/whispered and/or consecutive mode
    • Instances of communication breakdown, their causes, and whether you took the right action to repair them
    •  Your compliance with the principles of professional practice and your registration body’s code of conduct
  • You produce an accurate and justifiable analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of your performance as an interpreter
  • You identify ways in which your preparation for assignments could be improved

2. Plan and implement professional development

  • you use the evaluation of your performance to plan how you can improve your preparation for assignments and interpreting performance
  • your development goals and priorities are consistent with the evaluation of your performance
  • you identify and take relevant opportunities to develop your interpreting skills and knowledge
  • you set relevant criteria to evaluate your professional development programme
  • you regularly monitor and evaluate your professional development against the criteria you have set
  • you update and revise your plan in the light of the progress you make
  • you seek appropriate advice, if your progress and achievements do not meet your expectations

Knowledge and understanding

To evaluate your performance effectively, you need to make use of the knowledge components of Units A1, B1 and C1. You also must have knowledge of:

  • concepts and terminology commonly used to analyse interpreting performance, e.g. development of glossaries, choice of modes of interpreting, error analysis, chunking and the use of time-lag in simultaneous interpreting and the effectiveness of the interpretation in the context and environment of the assignment
  • methods to review and assess your preparation for assignments
  • methods to review your interpreting performance
  • methods to review your management of the interpreting assignments
  • methods to check that your analysis of strengths and weaknesses is accurate and justifiable

To plan and implement your development programme effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • strategies to improve your performance and knowledge
  • opportunities for continuing professional development, e.g. training courses, use of published materials or self-study
  • criteria and techniques to evaluate your development programme
  • the advice on continuing professional development available from professional bodies
  • sources of information, such as mentors, peers, clients and users, who
    can offer you advice on your development

CFAINTD2 – Enhance your performance as an advanced interpreter

Overview

This unit is about evaluating your performance and engaging in continuing professional development at an advanced level.
This is expressed in two elements:

1. Evaluate your performance as an advanced interpreter
2. Plan and implement continuing professional development

This involves selecting criteria and using these to evaluate your preparation and interpreting performance. You must be able to reflect on your skills, the context of the assignment and the dynamics of the interaction. You must be able to analyse your work independently and take on board feedback from others, e.g. other interpreters, as well as professionals in health, law, etc You must be aware of your professional and personal skills and able to identify areas for improvement.

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for D2 include those set for D1.

The unit is recommended for people who have professional interpreting skills and who would like to benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

When you evaluate your performance, you must show that:

  • you select criteria to review your preparation and interpreting performance and explain why you chose them
  • you use these criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of:
    • your preparation for interpreting assignments
    • your interpreting performance
    • your professional behaviour
  • you reflect on:
    • the context of the assignment(s)
    • the dynamics of the interaction, e.g. any power imbalance, and your management of it
    • any unusual aspects, such as requests by users for a specific mode of interpreting, emotional charge or technical difficulty
    • the emotional impact of assignments on your professional and private self
    • domain-specific requirements
    • any special requirements for technology
  • where appropriate, you make use of feedback from others, for example, users, clients, colleagues, your manager and professionals who work in the domain you covered e.g. health or law
  • you produce an accurate and justifiable analysis of your strengths and weaknesses as an interpreter
  • you demonstrate self-awareness of your professional and personal skills
  • you reflect on the perspective of the users
  • you take a holistic as well as a detailed approach to evaluation
  • you identify areas for improvement

When you plan and implement your continuing professional development, you must show that:

  • you use the evaluation of your performance to identify areas for improvement
  • you develop goals and priorities which are consistent with your evaluation of your performance
  • you identify and take relevant opportunities to develop your interpreting skills and knowledge
  • you set relevant criteria to evaluate your development programme and achievement against it
  • you regularly monitor and evaluate your development
  • you update and revise your plan in the light of the progress you make
  • you seek appropriate advice, if your progress and achievements do not meet

Knowledge and understanding

To evaluate your performance effectively, you need to make use of the knowledge components of A2, B2 and C2. In addition you must have knowledge of:

  • a wide range of concepts and strategies used to analyse interpreting performance
  • methods to review and assess your preparation for assignments
  • methods to review your management of the interpreting assignments
  • strategies for critically analysing ethical dilemmas and implications for the role of the interpreter
  • methods to check that your analysis of strengths and weaknesses is realistic and justifiable

To plan and implement your development programme effectively, you must have knowledge of:

  • strategies to improve your performance and knowledge
  • opportunities for development, e.g. training courses, use of published materials and self-study
  • criteria and techniques to evaluate your development programme
  • the advice on continuing professional development available from professional bodies
  • sources of information, such as peers, clients and users who can offer
    you advice on your development

CFAINTE1 – Support interpreting through sight translations of routine written documents

Overview

This unit is about producing translations of written documents at sight into oral or signed language. You may be required to do this within the context of an interpreting assignment when one of the users produces a document, the content of which needs to be translated at sight. You must be able to produce sight translations of documents, such as correspondence, personal status certificates or information leaflets.

If you are interpreting between spoken languages, you must be able to produce sight translations of written documents in either language. If you are a BSL/English interpreter, you must produce sight translations of documents which are written in English into BSL.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages (at least one of which has written form) and who would like to either develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter.

Performance criteria

When you produce a sight translation of a written document, you must show that:

  • you assess whether you are able to provide a sight translation of the document
  • you determine whether you are able to prepare a sight translation within a reasonable time (typically within twenty minutes)
  • you inform the user(s) of the interpreting service, if you need more preparation or research than is feasible given the time available and/or the context in which you are working, and you suggest an alternative solution
  • you make effective use of reference materials to check on vocabulary with which you are not familiar
  • you give an accurate sight translation of the contents of the document
  • you translate at sight factual information as well as concepts and opinions
  • you reflect the language, register and tone used in the document
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language
  • if necessary, you check and clarify any uncertainty of meaning with the
    user to whom the document belongs

Knowledge and understanding

To produce effective sight translations, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of providing a sight translation from written text
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for your first language; and level 4 for your other language(s) (see the Reading and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures, conventions and formats used to communicate orally/signed and written communication in the languages in which you interpret; and the implications of these aspects for translating a document at sight
  • register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate); the transfer of register from one language into another; and from written into spoken or signed language
  • techniques to assess the requirements for sight translations and the client’s and users’ needs
  • contract negotiation and agreement to carry out at sight translations, including time scales, payment, professional indemnity as well as third party insurance
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret and translate at sight
  • the use of reference materials, such as dictionaries and glossaries stored in hard copy or electronic format
  • alternatives to immediate sight translation, for example professional
    written translation services

CFAINTE2 – Support interpreting through sight translations of complex written documents

Overview

This unit is about producing translations at sight of complex written documents into oral or signed language. You may be required to do this within the context of an interpreting assignment when one of the users produces a document, the content of which needs to be translated at sight. You must be able to produce sight translations of a wide range of documents, such as abstracts, executive summaries, legal or business letters or medical case studies.

If you are interpreting between spoken languages, you must be able to produce sight translations of written documents in either language. If you are a BSL/English interpreter, you must produce sight translations of documents which are written in English into BSL

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for E2 include those set for E1.

The unit is recommended for people who have professional interpreting skills and who would like to either develop or benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

When you produce a sight translation of a written document, you must show that:

  • you assess whether you are able to provide a translation of the document within twenty minutes
  • you inform the user(s) of the interpreting service if you need more preparation or research than is feasible, given the time available and/or the context in which you are working, and suggest an alternative solution
  • you make effective use of reference materials to check on technical and specialist terms
  • you provide a sight translation of the contents of the document, conveying its meaning accurately and fluently
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terminology and phrases, if there is no direct equivalent in the target language
  • you reflect the meaning of the document and its register and tone
  • if necessary, you check and clarify any uncertainty of meaning with the user to whom the document belongs

Knowledge and understanding

To provide effective sight translations, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of producing a sight translation from written text
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for both your first language and any other languages in which you interpret (see the Reading and Speaking/Production units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects for the production of sight translations
  • register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate); the transfer of register from one language into another; and from written into spoken or signed language
  • techniques to assess the requirements for sight translations and the client’s and users’ needs
  • contract negotiation and agreement, including time scales, payment and professional indemnity as well as third party insurance
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret and translate at sight
  • the use of reference materials, such as dictionaries and glossaries stored in hard copy or electronic format
  • alternatives to immediate sight translation, for example professional
    written translation services

CFAINTF1 – Support interpreting through draft written translations of routine written documents

Overview

This unit is about producing draft written translations of written documents.
Draft written translations are working documents which are used to assist interpreting assignments, e.g. during a job interview or an appointment with a GP. You must be able to produce draft written translations of routine documents such as correspondence, personal status certificates or information leaflets. You must be able to produce the translation with minimal preparation and within one hour.

Draft written translations are not intended for publication and are not the equivalent of professionally produced translations.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages, who need to be able to translate from and into a written form of the language, and who would like either to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as a professional interpreter

Performance criteria

When you need to produce a draft written translation, you must show that:

  • you consider whether you are able to handle the demands of the text
  • you decide whether you can produce the translation immediately
  • you determine whether you need no more than one hour to perform the task
  • you suggest a constructive alternative, if you are unable to produce a written translation because of skills demands and/or restrictions of time
  • you produce a draft written translation which reflects the meaning of the document but does not need to be of publishable standard
  • you translate factual information as well as concepts and opinions
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language
  • you make effective use of reference material to check on technical and specialist terms
  • you check and clarify any uncertainty of meaning with the user to whom
    the document belongs

Knowledge and understanding

To produce effective draft written translations, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of translating written text from one language into another
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for your first language; and level 4 for your other language(s) (see the Reading and Writing units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the languages in which you interpret and the conventions and formats used in written documents
  • register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate) and the transfer of register between written languages
  • techniques to assess the requirements for written translations and the client’s and users’ needs
  • contract negotiation and agreement, including time scales, payment and
  • professional indemnity as well as third party insurance
  • the domains in which you interpret and translate
  • the use of reference materials, such as dictionaries and glossaries stored in hard copy or electronic format
  • alternatives to instant written translation, for example professional
    translation services

CFAINTF2 – Support interpreting through draft written translations of complex written documents

Overview

This unit is about producing draft written translations of complex written documents. Draft written translations are working documents which are used to assist interpreting assignments. You must be able to produce draft written translations of a variety of documents, such as such as abstracts, executive summaries, legal or business letters or medical case studies. You must be able to produce the translation with minimal preparation and within one hour.

Draft written translations are not intended for publication and are not the equivalent of professionally produced translations.

Please note that the knowledge and skills requirements for F2 include those set for F1.

The unit is recommended for people who have professional interpreting skills, who need to be able to translate from and into a written form of the language, and who would like either to develop or to benchmark advanced interpreting skills.

Performance criteria

When you need to produce a draft written translation, you must show that:

  • you determine whether you need no more than one hour to produce the written translation
  • you inform the client and suggest an alternative solution, if you need to carry out more preparation or research than is feasible in the time available
  • you make effective use of reference materials to check on technical and specialist terms
  • you produce a draft written translation which reflects the meaning of the document accurately but does not need to be of publishable standard
  • you reflect the language, register and tone used in the document
  • you paraphrase the meaning of complex terminology and phrases, if there is no direct equivalent in the target language
  • you translate factual information as well as concepts and opinions
  • you check and clarify any uncertainty of meaning with the user to whom the document belongs

Knowledge and understanding

To produce effective draft written translations, you must have knowledge of:

  • the process of translating written text from one language into another
  • the languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 5 for both your first language and any other languages in which you interpret (see the Reading andWriting units of the National Language Standards for performance and knowledge requirements)
  • the cultures of the two languages in which you interpret, the conventions and formats used for written communication, and their implications for the production of written translations
  • register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate) and the transfer of register between written languages
  • techniques to assess the requirements for written translations and the users’ needs
  • the domain(s) in which you interpret and translate
  • the use of reference materials, such as dictionaries and glossaries stored in hard copy or electronic format
  • alternatives to immediate written translation, for example professional
    written translation services

CFAINTG – Work with other interpreters

Overview

This unit is about working with other professional interpreters. This is expressed in two elements:

G.1 Plan for interpreting assignments as part of a team of interpreters
G.2 Deliver interpreting services as part of a team of interpreters

This involves negotiating with colleague interpreters how you will cover joint assignments. You must be able to work effectively as part of a team of interpreters, supporting colleague interpreters sensitively and professionally. You must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of the assignment in terms of your contribution and that of the team as a whole.

The unit is recommended for people who have excellent language skills in two or more languages and who would like either to develop or to accredit the skills needed to work as part of a team of professional interpreters

Performance criteria

When planning for interpreting assignments as part of a team of interpreters, you must show that:

  • You clarify your role and that of your colleagues
  • You negotiate how you and your colleagues(s) will cover the assignment, the order in which you will work as well as any breaks
  • You check that the work is allocated in the most effective way, making the most of your skills and those of your colleagues
  • You and your colleague negotiate how you carry out any necessary preparation and research
  • You agree appropriate alternative ways of organising your work, if arrangements for an assignment changed

When contributing to joint interpreting assignments, you must show that:

  • you organise your own activities effectively
  • you are an effective member of the team of interpreters
  • you make efficient use of resources
  • you inform the appropriate colleagues promptly of any difficulties in meeting your responsibilities
  • you make appropriate suggestions to improve the effectiveness of the interpreting team
  • your behaviour throughout the assignments is consistent with the
    professional code of conduct

Knowledge and understanding

Plan for interpreting assignments as part of a team of interpreters

  • how to communicate constructively within a team
  • how to make constructive suggestions to improve the effectiveness of the team
  • techniques and accepted conventions of working as part of a team of interpreters
  • how to set out and agree joint work objectives, performance measures and criteria to judge effectiveness
  • the principles of professional practice for interpreters

Deliver interpreting services as part of a team of interpreters

  • how to communicate constructively within a team
  • how to make constructive suggestions to improve the team’s effectiveness
  • techniques and accepted conventions of working as part of a team of interpreters
  • the team’s work objectives and related performance measures and success criteria
  • the principles of professional practice for interpreters

CFAINTH – Evaluate and improve language services to meet client and user needs

Overview

This unit is about your meeting the needs of clients and users by evaluating and improving language services.

These functions are expressed in three elements:

H.1 Implement and maintain quality assurance systems
H.2 Identify improvements to meet user requirements H.3 Implement improvements to language services

This involves evaluating and improving the effectiveness of your organisation, making use of performance indicators and identifying opportunities for the development of the service. You must be able to orientate yourself on new developments in interpreting, technology and data processing, and identify suitable applications for your service. You must be able to create realistic and cost-effective implementation plans and to monitor improvementsmade, involving staff and colleagues as appropriate.

The unit is recommended for people working as professional or advanced interpreters whose job requires them to manage language service delivery.

Performance criteria

Implement and maintain quality assurance systems

  • you select criteria to set up or review quality assurance systems
  • you implement quality assurance systems which offer the greatest potential for adding value and quality to the interpreting service
  • your plans for quality assurance systems make good use of resources and budgets
  • you encourage any directly employed staff and sub-contractors to assist in the development of quality assurance systems
  • you clearly explain the quality assurance system to those involved
  • you monitor the quality assurance systems on a regular basis

Identify improvements to meet user requirements

  • you orientate yourself on new developments in interpreting, technology and data processing and identify suitable applications for your service
  • you collect relevant, valid and reliable information on customers’
    requirements for language services
  • you regularly monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the language service
  • you identify opportunities for the development of the service and improvements in quality
  • you decide if your organisation has sufficient resources, e.g. in terms of budgets, staff and equipment, to implement identified improvements
  • you identify measures which may create or remove obstacles to improvement
  • you use the results of previous evaluations to review the development of the service over time
  • you identify improvements which offer the greatest potential for improving service to customers and achieving the language service’s goals

Implement improvements to language services

  • your implementation plans are realistic and achievable within the timescales set
  • you allocate resources for implementation which are realistic and cost effective
  • your plans clearly identify who will do what, and what outcomes and benefits are to be achieved by the improvements
  • you evaluate the outcomes of changes against expectations
  • you monitor improvements for their effect on the language service
  • you modify the implementation plan if any problems arise during its implementation
  • you consolidate the implementation plan, when there is enough evidence that it is working effectively

Knowledge and understanding

Implement and maintain quality assurance systems

  • quality assurance and control systems and how to identify systems relevant to a language service
  • how to gather data effectively
  • how to estimate the value for money offered by different systems
  • how to encourage others to contribute to implementation
  • methods of establishing, defining and reviewing objectives and performance measures
  • customer agreements and requirements
  • relevant guidelines and standards relating to quality

Identify improvements to meet user requirements

  • methods of collecting and analysing relevant information on changes in the delivery of interpreting, technology and resources
  • techniques to analyse customer requirements
  • processes and outputs of services and systems identified for improvement
  • legislation and organisational rules relevant to actual/typical circumstances
  • methods of monitoring resource utilisation and costs and analysing efficiency and effectiveness
  • results of previous analyses of services, products and systems

Implement improvements to language services

  • the current processes and outputs of the service you manage
  • how to plan for the implementation of improvements
  • change management and how to anticipate the effects of change on people, processes and outputs
  • methods of establishing defining and reviewing objectives and performance measures
  • strategies for monitoring resource utilisation and costs
  • how to analyse efficiency and effectiveness against targets
  • how to evaluate short and long term achievements against improvement plans

CFAINTI – Act as a mentor to trainee and colleague interpreters

Overview

This unit is about acting as a mentor for trainee and/or colleague interpreters.
This involves supporting them in the development of their interpreting and other work skills. You must be able to encourage individuals to evaluate their skills and performance, give constructive feedback and agree any action to be taken.

This unit is recommended for people working as professional or advanced interpreters whose job requires them to mentor trained or colleague interpreters.

Performance criteria

  • you make an initial assessment of how you can best support the interpreter
  • you negotiate a plan for action with the interpreter
  • you plan how you will gather evidence of skills, if this is needed to inform your judgement
  • you are sensitive to the needs of clients and users, and any requirement for confidentiality, if you observe a live interpreting assignment
  • you give feedback to the interpreter at an appropriate time and place
  • you encourage individuals to contribute to the evaluation of their skills and performance
  • your feedback is constructive and based on reliable data about the individual’s performance and achievements
  • you are sensitive to the level of skills and needs of the individual while providing feedback and advice
  • you agree action to be taken with the individual

Knowledge and understanding

  • how to plan for the gathering of evidence which is representative of
    interpreting performance and from which objective judgments can be
    derived
  • how to gather evidence on interpreter performance in a manner which is
    sensitive to the needs of interpreters, users and clients
  • how to evaluate evidence and make sure that your judgements are
    objective
  • how to encourage staff to assess their own performance and evaluate
    systems and procedures
  • how to give constructive feedback
  • suitable types of action to develop the skills of the interpreter and how to
    select and agree appropriate action
  • the level and type of direction and supervision which individuals may
    need
  • performance measures and success criteria