linguisthub logo

CFAINT1 - Prepare for interpreting assignments as a trainee interpreter

Overview

This unit is about developing your interpreting skills as a trainee interpreter. It provides an opportunity to develop your skills in a supported environment and with guidance from a mentor.

This unit is about preparing for routine interpreting assignments. This involves establishing the nature of assignments and considering whether you have the right skills. If you find that the task is beyond your competence, you decline the assignment. You seek advice from your mentor or supervisor, if you are unsure about aspects of interpreting or assignments.

You must be able to use a range of information sources to prepare for assignments. You must be fully aware of the role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practice.

The unit is recommended for people who have very good language skills in two languages and who would like to develop and/or accredit the skills needed on the way to full professional competence. This unit forms part of a progression route towards professional interpreter status.

Performance criteria

  • Communicate to the client that you are a trainee interpreter, if they are not already aware.
  • Identify:
    •  The subject matter and purpose of the assignment.
    •  The level of language and interpreting skills required.
  • Assess whether the mode of consecutive interpreting is suitable for the assignment.
  • Seek advice from your mentor, if you doubt whether you have the necessary level of skills for the assignment.
  • Do not accept any assignment which is beyond your competence in terms of subject matter, degree of complexity or simultaneous mode of interpreting.
  • Agree contract details, including location and timescales, and any payment.
  • Check with your employer, placement provider or professional association that you are insured.
  • If appropriate, request in advance of the assignment a briefing session and sight of documents to be used.
  • Plan appropriately so that you will be able to deal with:
    • The type and topic of the assignment.
    • The language likely to be used during the assignment.
    • Any weaknesses in your language skills and processing skills and how you overcome these.
    • Domain-specific language.
    • The cultural and communication conventions of the users.
    • Any special requirements, and expectations of the users, including the positioning of the users and yourself.
    • Commonly encountered dilemmas.
  • Use terminology accurately to describe interpreting and language features.
  • Use relevant sources of information.
  • Compile and maintain a glossary of terminology.
  • Seek advice from your mentor on a regular basis.

Knowledge and understanding

  • The languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 6 in your first language; and at level 4 in your other language.
  • The process of interpreting from one language into another and how to reflect the meaning of the source language into the target language.
  • The cognitive processing involved in interpreting, concepts such as reformulation, and strategies to deal with an unknown word or phrase.
  • The cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects on the planning for the interpreting assignment.
  • The cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication, and the implications of these aspects on the planning for the interpreting assignment.
  • The concept of domain-specific terminology.
  • Techniques to anticipate the type and the degree of difficulty of the assignment and the client’s and users’ needs.
  • Terminology to describe aspects of language and communication and to compare features of the languages in which you interpret.
  • The role of the interpreter and the principles of professional conduct, specifically the need to:
    • Turn down any assignment which is beyond your competence.
    • Be impartial, and maintain integrity and professionalism.
    • Treat all information you receive in the course of your duties as confidential, unless required to disclose by law
  • Contract negotiation, including time scales, any payment and professional indemnity as well as third party insurance.
  • Techniques to research and verify terminology.
  • Techniques to compile and maintain glossaries of terminology.
  • Sources of general and specialist information to assist with assignments, e.g. internet, leaflets, video and glossaries.
  • Study skills and the ability to handle extended reading in both languages.

CFAINT2 – Interpret two-way as a trainee interpreter

Overview

This unit is about developing your interpreting skills as a trainee interpreter. It provides an opportunity to develop your skills in a supported environment and with guidance from a mentor.

This unit is about carrying out two-way interpreting assignments. The setting is typically face-to-face and one-to-one interactions between two language users, for example to discuss a complaint about a bureaucratic mistake or an interview between a service provider and a customer about access to services. Please note that, at this level, one-way interpreting does not form part of the units.

At this level the contexts of the assignments and topics re- occur frequently and are of low complexity. As a guide, the typical length of the interpreting undertaken at this level will be up to fifteen minutes.

Any misunderstandings as a result of poor interpreting do not have irreversible consequences. If it becomes clear during the assignment that it is beyond your competence, you withdraw and negotiate alternative arrangements in consultation with your mentor or supervisor.

The unit is recommended for people who have very good language skills in two languages and who would like to develop and/or accredit the skills needed on the way to full professional competence.

This unit forms part of a progression route towards professional interpreter status.

Performance criteria

  • Communicate to the users that you are a trainee interpreter, if they are not already aware.
  • Interpret largely accurately the meaning expressed by users who communicate across two languages.
  • Interpret largely accurately the meaning expressed by users who communicate across two languages.
  • Have some ability to reflect the language users’ register and attitude but not yet total control.
  • Interpret consecutively.
  • While you may omit some information and not always relay information completely accurately, have good strategies to repair mistakes.
  • Paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language.
  • Check back with the source language user if you are unable to interpret or are not sure that you have interpreted the meaning accurately.
  • Withdraw from the assignment if it becomes clear that it is beyond your competence and you negotiate alternative arrangements.
  • Support effective communication throughout the assignment and take action if communication breaks down.
  • Interpret factual information and reflect opinions largely accurately.
  • Handle the standard national variety of the languages in which you interpret.
  • Take notes during consecutive interpreting, where required.
  • Your conduct is consistent with the principles of professional practice and the registration body’s code of conduct.
  • Your social and interpersonal skills enable you to interact effectively before, during and after the assignment.
  • Seek advice from your mentor on a regular basis.

Knowledge and understanding

  • The languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 6 in your first language; and at level 4 in your other language.
  • The process of interpreting from one language into another and how to reflect the meaning of the source language into the target language.
  • The cognitive processing involved in interpreting and concepts such as long-term and working memory, reformulation and time lag.
  • The cultures of the languages in which you interpret and their conventions for communication.
  • The concept of register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate) and the transfer of register from one language into the other.
  • The concept of consecutive and simultaneous/whispered modes of interpreting and when you might use these.
  • Techniques to manage communication if it breaks down in one or more of the following ways.
    • You need to check on meaning.
    • The degree of complexity, technicality or emotional charge is beyond your ability to deal with it.
    • An apparent lack of understanding or misunderstanding hinders communication between the source and target language user.
    • Your position and/or that of the users hinders communication.
    • The users are communicating too fast or too slowly.
    • The users fail to observe appropriate turn-taking.
  • The role of the interpreter and the principles of professional practice.
  • The concept of the domain in interpreting.
  • Health and safety requirements.
  • Techniques of taking notes when interpreting in consecutive mode.

CFAINT3 – Develop your performance as a trainee interpreter

Overview

This unit is about developing your interpreting skills as a trainee interpreter. It provides an opportunity to develop your skills in a supported environment and with guidance from a mentor.  In addition, you may also need to attend formal training and receive support and advice from others, e.g. colleague interpreters.

This unit is about your ability to evaluate your performance as an interpreter. It involves keeping a journal to reflect on your interpreting assignments and recording yourself on video or digitally while interpreting. Together with your mentor, you evaluate your interpreting skills and your preparation for assignments. You identify your strengths and weaknesses and seek feedback from your mentor or supervisor. You undertake training to develop your skills and knowledge.

The unit is recommended for people who have very good language skills in two languages and who would like to develop and/or accredit the skills needed on the way to full professional competence. This unit forms part of a progression route towards professional interpreter status.

Performance criteria

  • Reflect on the effectiveness of your preparation for assignments.
  • Reflect on the effectiveness of your interpreting performance:
    • How well you caught the overall meaning.
    • Whether you captured the main points.
    • How well you captured a sequence of events or actions.
    • How well you used discourse markers to structure the interpretation.
    • How well your use of register matched that of the source language user.
  • Reflect on the accuracy of the language that you used while interpreting, e.g. vocabulary and syntax.
  • Evaluate how well you managed the assignment in terms of:
    • Your conduct, style and interaction with users.
    • The approach you took to dealing with cultural conventions.
    • Instances of communication breakdown and imperfect interpreting, their causes, and whether you took the right action to repair them.
    • Your compliance with the principles of professional practice.
  • Use terminology accurately to describe language and interpreting features, while evaluating your performance.
  • Discuss your findings with your mentor.
  • Identify ways in which you can improve:
    • Your preparation for assignments.
    • Your interpreting skills.
    • The evaluation of your work.
  • Identify and take relevant opportunities to develop your interpreting skills and knowledge.
  • Review your progress and achievements with your mentor on a regular basis.

Knowledge and understanding

  • Terminology to describe aspects of language and communication and to compare features of the languages in which you interpret.
  • Training opportunities available from professional bodies.
  • Opportunities for development, e.g. training courses, published materials, resources available on the internet, peer evaluation and networking with other interpreters.

CFAINT4 – Support interpreting through sight translations of simple written documents

Overview

This unit is about developing your interpreting skills as a trainee interpreter. It provides an opportunity to develop your skills in a supported environment and with guidance from a mentor.

This unit is about producing translations at sight of simple written documents into oral or signed language.  You may be required to do this within the context of an interpreting assignment when one of the users produces a document, the content of which needs to be translated at sight. This may involve producing sight translations of documents such as a simple, short letter, personal status certificate or a simple leaflet. Your mentor will decide if the type and degree of complexity of the text is within your range of skills.

If you are interpreting between spoken languages, you must be able to produce sight translations of written documents in either language. If you are a BSL/English interpreter, you must produce sight translations of documents which are written in English into BSL.

The unit is recommended for people who have very good language skills in two languages and who would like to develop and/or accredit the skills needed on the way to full professional competence.

The unit is recommended for trainee interpreters, where at least one of the languages in which they interpret has a written form. This unit forms part of a progression route towards professional interpreter status.

Performance criteria

  • Give an accurate sight translation of the contents of the document.
  • Translate at sight factual information as well as concepts and opinions.
  • Reflect broadly the language, register and tone used in the document.
  • Paraphrase the meaning of complex terms and phrases, if you do not know the direct equivalent in the target language.
  • If necessary, check and clarify any uncertainty of meaning with the user to whom the document belongs.
  • If you have access to reference materials, make effective use of these to check on unfamiliar vocabulary.

Knowledge and understanding

  • The process of providing a sight translation from written text.
  • The languages in which you interpret, with the ability to function at level 6 in your first language; and at level 4 in your other language.
  • The cultures, conventions and formats used to communicate oral/signed and written communication in the languages in which you interpret; and the implications of these aspects for translating a document at sight.
  • Register (frozen, formal, informal, colloquial and intimate); the transfer of register from one language into another; and from written into spoken or signed language.
  • The use of reference materials, such as dictionaries and glossaries stored in hard copy or electronic format.