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Professional Associations of Translators and Interpreters Around the World

AIIC – International Association of Conference Interpreters – AIIC has brought together over 3,000 conference interpreters from all over the world (more than 100 countries) since it was founded in 1953. All its members adhere to a strict code of ethics and standards. Becoming a member requires candidates to have done at least 150 days’ work as a conference interpreter and have at least 3 sponsors (senior active members of AIIC) who can support their application.

AITC – International Association of Conference Translators – AITC’s main aim is, on the one hand, to represent the interests of its members (around 450) and also to ensure they provide high quality work. This organisation reunites translators, précis-writers, revisers and editors and offers three types of membership: active member (a translator must possess a minimum of 300 days’ professional experience working for international organisations or international conferences, including100 days’ experience gained during the two years prior to applying for membership), candidate member (at least 100 days’ professional experience working for international organisations or international conferences – limited to 3 years) and associate member.

ATIDA – Arabic Translation and Intercultural Dialogue Association – An association dedicated to translators who work from and into Arabic. Apart from providing its members with an e-portal to meet their needs, it also organises training courses and workshops.

ATN / APTS – Arab Professional Translators Society – Also dedicated to Arab language professionals, this non-profit association facilitates communication between freelancers, agencies and clients. The members also have access to forums, magazines and a comprehensive terminology bank. Anyone can register as a member (online), but in order to become a certified member, one needs to pass the association’s certification exam.

CEATL – European Council of Associations of Literary Translators – An international not-for-profit association created in 1993 with the purpose to bring together literary translators’ associations from different European countries. Its 34 member associations from 28 European countries (approximately 10,000 authors) can exchange views and information.

CETL – Centre européen de traduction littéraire (European Centre for Literary Translation) – The main purpose of this organisation is to offer post-graduate training in literary translation. Seminars and workshops are led by the best professionals in the field.

EAFT – European Association for Terminology – EAFT is a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the field of terminology in Europe. It promotes multilingualism while providing a European platform to raise awareness of terminological activities. It liaises and cooperates with other relevant organisations, associations and institutions.

ELIA – European Language Industry Association – A not-for-profit organisation which aims to represent and promote the interests of the language industry in Europe by developing relationships with related bodies from all over the world. Its members have access to a forum where they can keep in touch and exchange information.

ESIST – European Association for Studies in Screen Translation – This association is dedicated to higher education teachers, practitioners, academics and students in the field of audio-visual translation. Its aim is to facilitate the exchange of information and to promote professional standards in field.

EUATC – European Union of Associations of Translation Companies – This organisation reunites national associations of translation companies across Europe. It promotes the highest standards of quality and business practice, while providing translation companies with a united voice.

EULITA – European Legal Interpreters and Translators Association – EULITA brings together members of professional associations of legal interpreters and translators from the EU member states. Its main aim is to ensure access to justice across languages and cultures. It promotes quality in legal interpreting and translation, sustains the establishment of registers of qualified legal interpreters and translators, while also closely cooperating with academic institutions in the field of training and research.

GALA – Globalization and Localization Association – World’s biggest non-profit organisation for the language industry, GALA provides resources for many companies around the world. Its mission is to support its members by sharing knowledge and actively promoting the language services industry.

IAPTI – International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters – This association reunites translators and interpreters and serves to promote ethical practices in the language industry, as well as specialisation and professional development for its members.

IATIS – International Association for Translation & Intercultural Studies – A world-wide forum, home to members from a variety of regions and backgrounds, where they can talk about translations and more.

IMIA – International Medical Interpreters Association – Although based in the United States, this organisation is dedicated to professional medical interpreters all around the world. It has more than 2,000 members and is the largest organisation of its kind.

IFT – International Federation of Translators – IFT or better known as FIT (Fédération Internationale des Traducteurs) reunites over 100 associations of translators and interpreters from 55 countries. Its aim is to promote professionalism in the industry.

TAALS – The American Association of Language Specialists – This professional association is dedicated to professionals in the field who work at international level. To become a member, one has to meet the strict requirements and to adhere to a strict code of professional and ethical standards.

Translators for Peace – As the names suggests, the members of this association (free and open to translators of all nationalities and from anywhere in the world) are dedicated to translate and publish any message against war.

Translators Without Borders – With more than 100 members, TWB is a non-profit association based in France. Initially set up to provide free translations for Doctors Without Borders, it later extended its help to other NGOs. All the translators are native speakers of the language they work into and are chosen according to their qualifications and specialisation.

WASLI – World Association of Sign Language Interpreters – Set up in 2003 by 60 interpreters from 20 countries together with WFD (World Federation of the Deaf General) General Secretary, WASLI welcomes interpreters and interpreter association from all over the world.

AITA – Albanian Interpreters & Translators Association – Translators and interpreters in Albania can get in touch with the association using their Facebook page. This association aims to promote professional recognition.

AATI – Argentine Association of Translators and Interpreters – Member of FIT, AATI is a non-profit organisation with over 200 members in the field of translation and interpreting. It protects and represents the interests of literary, scientific and technical translators and interpreters.

AATT – Argentine Association of Technical-Scientific Translators – This NGO is dedicated to professional technical-scientific translators in Argentina whose language combination is English into Spanish. It aims to promote professional ethics, as well as to assist and represent its members.

ADICA – Argentine Association of Conference Interpreters – ADICA has been promoting the highest standards in the field of conference interpreting since its foundation in 1979.

Association of Sworn Translators of the City of Buenos Aires – Colegio de Traductores Públicos de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires – A local association dealing with professional ethics, CPD and professional registration.

CTPSF – Colegio de Traductores de Santa Fe (1º circ.) – A regional association, CTPSF (the Translators Association of the Province of Santa Fe – First District) aims to promote and insure professional ethics and industry standards and represents the interests of its members.

CTPSF – Colegio de Traductores de Santa Fe (2da circ.) – The Association of Translators of the Province of Santa Fe, 2nd District, deals with the legal aspect of the profession and promotes collaboration between the members of the association.

AALITRA – Australian Association for Literary Translation – If you are from Australia and have an interest in literary translation, this is the organisation for you. It promotes all aspects of this field and keeps its members up to date about relevant conferences and events.

AAHIT – Australian Association of Health Interpreters and Translators – Dedicated to translators and interpreters who work for the Health industry, this association aims to provide professional support to its members by providing regular relevant training and to promote the highest standards of service.

AUSIT – Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators – As the name suggests, the Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators is a professional body for translators and interpreters in Australia, with more than 750 members across Australia. It is affiliated with FIT. Its members adhere to a strict Code of Ethics and follow continuous professional development.

ACCI – Austrian Association of Certified Court Interpreters. – Founded over 75 years ago, this non-profit association serves the interests of sworn and certified translators in Austria. It maintains contact with all the relevant Austrian authorities and appoints the examiners that are in charge of the certification exam for sworn and certified court interpreters. It has around 600 members and is part of FIT/IFT.

Austrian Interpreters and Translators Association – The association’s goals are to represent the interests of its members and to educate the public about the importance of qualified translators and interpreters

ATLB – Association des Traducteurs Littéraires de Belgique – This association is open to literary translators in Belgium and offers three types of membership: full member (you need to have translated at least a literary work from or into French and to have been granted copyright), associate member (you need to have translated at least a literary work into or from any langauge and to have been granted copyright) or trainee member (anyone who wishes to become a literary translator but does not yet meet the criteria to become a full or associate member – this memebership type is limited to 3 years).

BQTA – Belgian Quality Translation Association – Belgian Quality Translation Association – is the Belgian association of translation companies, a non-profit organisation founded in 1995 to promote and organise networking between translation companies while observing a strict professional code of ethics

CBTI-BKVT – Belgian Chamber of Translators and Interpreters – Founded in 1955, it has received royal association title in 2006. To become a full member, one must: have a master’s degree in translation or interpreting, be accredited by an international institution or have a minimum of 3 years’ professional experience. Other practitioners can also become Associate Members.

UPBH – Association of Translators and Interpreters of Bosnia and Herzegovina – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Bosnia and Herzegovina was founded in 2008 and is made up of three sections: 1. Section for Scientific and Technical Translation; 2. Section for Conference Interpretation; 3. Section for Literary Translation.

ABRATES – Brazilian Association of Translators – The Brazilian Association of Translators is an association which represents professional translators and institutions. It aims to promote professional development, the dissemination of information, encourages exchange programs, by supporting conferences and courses and by publishing job opportunities. ABRATES facilitates the exchange of information between professionals in the translation field and entities related to the activity, such as schools, teachers and translation companies, as well as the exchange of information between its members.

ACETESP – Associação Cearense de Tradutores Públicos – A civil entity with temporary headquarters in Fortaleza, The Association of Public Translators aims to: represent its members in court or elsewhere, promote exchanges involving national and international organisations and institution in order to promote dissemination of technological innovation, products, contests and other professional opportunities.

APIC – Associação Profissional de Intépretes de Conferência (Brazil) – Founded in 1971, The Professional Association of Conference interpreters seeks to maintain the highest level of technical skills and professional performance. Among its goals there are the following: to represent and defend the interests of its members, to ensure the quality of professional practice, to establish certain working conditions, to ensure the application of ISO standards and to facilitate communication between different institutions.

ATP-MG – Associação dos Tradutores Públicos de Minas Gerais – Officially recorded in 2009, The Association of Public Translators of Minas Gerais seeks to integrate new and existing members the best way possible, to conduct consumer education campaigns, to create partnerships with associations from other states and to stimulate the creation of new associations. It has offices in 8 cities and provides translations to and from German, Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, French, English, Dutch, Italian and Latin.

ATPRIO – Professional Association of Sworn Public Translators and Commercial Interpreters of the State of Rio de Janeiro – The Professional Association of Sworn Public Translators and Commercial Interpreters of the State of Rio de Janeiro provides translations to and from 6 languages (English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish) in 5 major cities in Brazil.

ATPIESP – Associação Profissional dos Tradutores Públicos e Intérpretes Comerciais, do Estado de São Paulo – The Professional Association of Public Translators and Interpreters of São Paulo – ATPIESP, was founded over 50 years ago and encompasses the majority of translators in the state of Sao Paulo and it advertises each of them in different media outlets. The magnitude of ATPIESP makes it a great channel of communication, by representing its members before authorities, public institutions and companies. It provides translations to and from 22 languages.

SINTRA – Sindicato Nacional dos Tradutores – Officially recognised in 1988, SINTRA, The National Union of Translators encompasses professionals who provide translations to and from 41 languages. The main goals of SINTRA are: to ensure adequate remuneration, to solve disputes between translators and customers and to reach copyright recognition.

BTU – Bulgarian Translators’ Union – BTU is a non-profit organisation of professionals, established in 1974 and registered as an association in 2001 and it is a member of the International Federation of Translators. It is structured into six sections, according to the genre of the translation and provides quality translations to and from 46 languages.

ACJT – Canadian Association of Legal Translators – The Canadian Association of Legal Translators has been active for over 25 years, and practises translations in the private and public sectors. Members must hold a bachelor’s degree in law, work in the field of legal translations and pay a yearly fee.

AILIA – Canadian Language Industry Association – The Canadian Language Industry Association’s stated purpose is that of helping the Canadian language industry grow through competitiveness. Membership benefits include support in professional development, information exchange, the right to participate in events and conferences and building market opportunities all throughout Canada. Members include Corporates, Associates, Partners, Individuals and Students.

ATIA – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Alberta (Canada) – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Alberta was born in 1979 and it is the only one of its kind in the entire province. Members include translators of over 30 languages specialised in various fields and they may be freelancers, independent translators, in-house corporate translators or employees of translation companies. As a member of the Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council (CTTIC), ATIA is also linked to the International Federation of Translators (IFT).

ATIO – Association of Translators and Interpreters of Ontario (Canada) – Having been created in 1920 (under the name of “Association technologique de langue française d’Ottawa”), The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Ontario is the oldest organisation of its kind in Canada. Their stated goal is that of ensuring high quality work in the field of translations and, as other regional associations of translators, it is affiliated with CTTIC (which in turn is affiliated with ATIO). Membership is open for translators, terminologists, conference interpreters, court interpreters and students who are candidates for certification.

ATIM – Association of Translators and Interpreters of Manitoba (Canada) – ATIM was formed in 1980 and it is affiliated with CTTIC. The organisation’s objectives are: protecting its members and giving them a collective voice, as well as ensuring that they respect a certain Code of Ethics.

ATINS – Association of Translators and Interpreters of Nova Scotia – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Nova Scotia (ATINS) is an organisation founded in 1990 whose purpose is to give its members the chance to improvement and to offer clients with high quality services. There are two types of membership: associate (for those who haven’t passed the certification exam yet) and certified (for those who passed it already).

ATIS – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Saskatchewan – The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Saskatchewan was founded in 1980 and it is affiliated with CTTIC. The membership can be either of the “associate” type or of the “certified” type and the languages they translate to/ from cover a wide range, from French, English, Spanish, and Russian to Chinese and Korean.

AVLIC – The Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada – The Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) is a professional association for sign language. It is the only certifying body for ASL-English interpreters in Canada.

CATS – Canadian Association for Translation Studies – The Canadian Association for Translation Studies was created in1987 with the purpose of bringing together translation professionals. The membership is open to academic and professional individuals interested in teaching and researching translation, interpretation, writing and terminology studies.

CTINB – Corporation of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters of New Brunswick – The Corporation of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters of New Brunswick was born in 1970 and two years later it became affiliated with CTTIC. It has two categories of members: “certified” (who have passed the standard certification exam or the interpretation examination) and “candidate for certification” (who have limited professional experience/ formal studies).

CTTIC – Canadian Translators, Terminologist and Interpreters Council (Conseil des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes du Canada) – CTTIC brings together eleven associations dedicated to language professionals in Canada (approximately 3,500 translators, interpreters and terminologists). It is affiliated with FIT.

GSAT – Concordia University Graduate Students Association in Translation – Graduate Students Association in Translation is an organisation open to students enrolled in French Translation programs. The association’s main goal is that of representing its members in the university affairs. Also, GSAT organises the only student conference in translation studies in North America.

Literary Translators’ Association of Canada (LTAC) (or, in French, Association des traducteurs et traductrices littéraires du Canada (ATTLC) – Another association dedicated to literary translators, this time reuniting translators all over Canada. Also affiliated with FIT. Most of its members translate from French or English, but many work in other languages too.

NTE – Network of Translators in Education (Canada) – The Network of Translators in Education was created in 1985 and it brings together professionals from various fields (from writing to translations). The network is present in the most important parts of Canada, as well as in the United States of America. There are more than 80 members, mostly focusing on educational sectors, but also on government organisations and agencies, and other sectors.

Nunavut Interpreter / Translator Society – The Nunavut Interpreter / Translator Society was created in 1994 and it is an affiliate of the Canadian Translators and Interpreters Council. The society brings together certified members, associate members and corporate members, all of whom specialise in English-Inuktitut, Inuktitut-English, French-Inuktitut and Inuktitut-French translations/ interpretations.

OTTIAQ – Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec (Canada) – The history of OTTIAQ (Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec) dates as far as 1940 and it currently has over 2,000 members. They only accept certified translators, but they do feature a mentorship program (on-the-job mentorship, mentorship for self-employed individuals or co-op mentorship).

STIBC – Society of Translators and Interpreters of British Colombia (Canada) – The Society of Translators and Interpreters of British Columbia was born in 1981 and it is an affiliate of CTTIC. Its aims are: ensuring the quality of the translation services (through a Code of Ethics all its members observe) and protecting the rights of the translations professionals who are members of the association. Membership is of 3 types: Founding Members, Certified Members (around 300 in number) and Associate Members (around 300 in number). The certified members cover an impressive number of 80 language combinations. Anyone who applies is first enrolled as an Associate member, and then they can apply for certification.

COTICH – Chilean Association of Translators and Interpreters – The Chilean Association of Translators and Interpreters was created in 1991 to give translation professionals protection for their interests. There are three honorary members, and there is also a large number of active members.

Hong Kong Translation Society – The Hong Kong Translation Society was incorporated in 1971 and in 1991 it became a registered charitable organisation. Its purpose is providing with opportunities to exchange information. Also, they have a scholarship meant to recognise academic merits in the field of translation studies.

TAC – Translators Association of China – Born in 1982, The Translators Association of China is the only organisation of its kind in the country. Thus, it functions both at an academic level and at the level of a trade association. Membership is of 3 types: group, corporate/ institutional and individual members. Only individual membership is open to translators, interpreters and terminologists outside of China who already belong to a FIT association.

ACTI – Asociación Colombiana de Traductores e Intérpretes – The Colombian Association of Interpreters and Translators is a professional, non-profit organisation founded in 1998, with a small number of select members (under 100). To apply for membership, they require: an undergraduate degree, minimum 5 years of experience in translations and professional training. Members fall into one of 3 categories: founding members, associate and junior members. ACTI seeks to ensure professionalism in translation and interpretation and to represent members before third parties.

CCT – Colegio Colombiano de Traductores – The purpose of CCT – The Colombian Association of Translators, is to unionise and defend the interests of translators in Colombia. It has 34 members which provide translations from and to English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Italian and German.

ANTIO – Asociación National de Traductores e Intérpretes Oficiales – ANTIO (National Association of Official Translators and Interpreters) is open to anyone working as an official translator and interpreter who can prove their qualification and abide by ANTIO’s Code of Ethics.

Croatian Literary Translators’ Association – The DHKP, Croatian Literary Translators’ Association, was first registered in court in 1953 and in 1994 was admitted under the European Council of Translators and Interpreters. Today, it has more than 220 members which provide translations to and from almost 30 different languages. Each potential member is evaluated by the association according to previous education and published translations.

HDZTP – Croatian Association of Scientific and Technical Translators – The Croatian Association of Scientific and Technical Translators was born in 1957. It includes over 300 members who are native speakers of the target language into which they translate. They are all professionals of the fields into which they translate, ensuring the quality of their work this way.

PanUTI – Pancyprian Union of Graduate Translators and Interpreters – The Pancyprian Union of Graduate Translators and Interpreters is a professional, ethical and non-profit organisation which has over 100 members in 6 different countries. It aims to promote professionalism in translation and interpreting in Cyprus, further education for its members and to uphold the interests of its members.

JTP – Union of Interpreters and Translators – Founded in 1990, the Union of Interpreters and Translators is an independent, open and voluntary organisation of professional interpreters and translators and is a member of the International Federation of Translators. JTP is committed to elevating the prestige of the profession and the quality of translation and interpretation. Its members provide translations to and from 61 different languages.

The Translators’s Guild – The Czech Literary Translators’ Guild is open to belle lettres translators, as well as to translation theorists, scholars or critics. The association’s role is both protecting the rights of the members and ensuring the quality of their services. Also, the Guild annually organises a series of seminars, workshops and participates in the organisation of national literary awards.

Association of Danish Authorized Translators – The members of The Association of Danish Authorized Translators and Interpreters are all certified by the Danish Government. Also, they are specialised in a wide variety of fields, from technical translations, to marketing translations, subtitling and financial translations.

DT – Danish Association of State-Authorised Translators and Interpreters – The members of the Danish Authorised Translators and Interpreters have received master’s degree in translation studies and they have specialised in a specific field of translations, thus making their services suitable for the business community and for the public sector as well.

Danish Authors’ Society – Founded in 1894, the Danish Authors’ Society nowadays comprises over 1,300 members (authors, translators and interpreters). They are all organised in 5 groups: poetry, fiction, non-fiction, children’s literature and translations.

ATIEC – Ecuadorian Association of Translators and Interpreters – The first association of its kind in Ecuador, ATIEC was created in 2007 with the purpose to bring together translation and interpreting professionals, either Ecuadorian or foreign professionals working in Ecuador. Its members are professionals locally or internationally accreditated in several language pairs.

EGYTA – Egyptian Translators Association – EGYTA is the Egyptian Translators’ Association and it works towards creating the conditions that safeguard the interests of the translators. Applying members must be graduates of any language discipline.

ETTL – Estonian Association of Interpreters and Translators – The Estonian Association of Interpreters and Translators was created in 1992 and it is a non-profit organisation which aims at promoting Estonian translation services in and outside of the country, as well as at protecting the rights of the Estonian member translators and interpreters. Members translate to and from 23 languages, including Russian, Swedish, Czech, Norwegian, Dutch, Bulgarian, Arabic and Latin.

SKTL – Finnish Association of Translators and Interpreters – The Finnish Association of Translators and Interpreters was founded in 1955 and it currently has around 1,900 members, also itself a member of FIT and of EULITA. All of the members are translation/ interpretation professionals and researchers.

AAE-ESIT – Association des Anciens Élèves de l’École Supérieure d’Interprètes et de Traducteurs – This non-profit association reunites more than 900 members, translators and interpreters working in more than 40 language pairs, including French Sign Language. In order to qualify as a member, a candidate must have a three-year Master’s Degree awarded by the École Supérieure d’Interprètes et de Traducteurs (ESIT, Graduate School of Translation and Interpreting, Université de la Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III)

AFILS – Aassociation française des interprètes et traducteurs en langue des signes – The French Association of Translators and Interpreters in Sign Language first started out in 1970. Any interpreter or translation graduate can apply to become a member of AFILS and they benefit from periodical meetings, seminars and from being listed as a member of the association.

APROTRAD – Association professionnelle des métiers de la traduction – Born in 1993, APROTRAD currently comprises today over 50 members (translators, interpreters, translation companies and representatives of other related professions). It is affiliated with Grand maillage (network of professionals in Central France), with EFIP (European Forum of Independent Professionals) and with CAPIL (Coordination of the Associations Representing Freelance Professionals).

ATAA – Association des Traducteurs / Adaptateurs de l’Audiovisuel – The Association of Audiovisual Translators / Interpreters was created in 2006. It provides professional writing, dubbing, subtitles and deaf subtitles and voice-overs from nearly 200 members. Membership is open to all professional translators and interpreters who pay a periodical fee. The association aims to promote dialogue and communication, to bring together translators and interpreters and defend their interests and to work towards the recognition of the profession.

ATIA – Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters in Aquitaine – The Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters in Aquitaine has two main goals: to protect translation-related professionals and to ensure good communication between customers and professionals.

ATLAS – Assises de la Traduction Littéraire en Arles – ATLAS is a cultural association with the goal of promoting translated literature as a creative activity and to link interested people and scholars. Members receive regular reviews and newsletters, have the opportunity to attend various seminars, symposiums and trainings.

ATLF – The French Literary Translators’ Association – ATLF was born in 1973, as a separate entity emerging from the French Society of Translators (SFT), with the purpose to specifically defend the rights of literary translators. In order to become a member, one needs to have translated at least a creative piece of work.You can also join as probationary/interim member if you are a student or have not yet been published as a translator.

CETIECAP – Compagnie des Experts Traducteurs et Interprètes en Exercice près la Cour d’Appel de Paris – The Company of Expert Translators and Interpreters Working in Paris Court of Appeal provides translations from and to 55 languages and aims to promote mutual support between its members, to ensure communication between the company and third parties and to defend the interests of its members by all legal means, among others.

Chambre des Experts-Traducteurs et Traducteurs Jurés de l’Est – Chambre des Experts-Traducteurs et Traducteurs Jurés de l’Est (Translators’ Association site based in the East of France) is a non-profit organisation created in 1930. Its members are either experts or sworn-in translators and they are approved by the Court of Appeal in Nancy, Colmar and Metz or by the County Court in their specific jurisdictions.

CRETA – Chambre Régionale des Experts Traducteurs Assermentés d’Alsace – CRETA is a professional association whose members are sworn in at the Court of Appeal of Colmar. Its main aim is putting in contact potential clients with individual professionals.

SFT – The French Association of Translators – Any professional translator (who is paid for their work – in-house and self-employed language service providers as well as literary translators) may apply for membership in the French Association of Translators. They benefit from participating in periodical seminars and trainings provided by international partners, from being part of a tightly knit community of translators and from legal protection.

UNETICA – Union Nationale des Experts Traducteurs Interprètes près les Cours d’Appel (National Union of Expert Translators and Interpreters for Courts of Appeal) – UNETICA is a national association that brings together experts translators and interpreters of the Courts of Appeal in France. It offers its members information, training and assistance, representing their interests at national and local levels. UNETICA is a member of FIT.

ADÜ Nord – Assoziierte Dolmetscher und Übersetzer in Norddeutschland e.V. – With approximately 350 members, this association of translators and interpreters based in Northern Germany works with more than 50 languages in various fields. Membership is subject to strict requirements (university degree in interpreting/translation, examination recognised by the state or acceptance by an admission committee).

ATICOM – Fachverband der Berufsübersetzer und Berufsdolmetscher e.V – The Association for Professional Translators and Interpreters provides translation to and from 32 different languages and in 27 different major fields. The association liaises with other professional organisations outside Germany and represents the interests of its members. Applicants for membership must hold a university diploma in translation or a related field and test as a certified interpreter or translator, or they can be taken in under Student membership.

BDÜ – Bundesverband der Dolmetscher und Übersetzer e.V. – The Federal Association of Interpreters and Translators is the largest association of its kind in Germany, with over 7,000 members. Membership is open to all freelance interpreters, in-house translators and even students, but they have to prove their proficiency in the languages in which they translate and in the field of expertise.

DGÜD – Deutschen Gesellschaft für Übersetzungs- und Dolmetschwissenschaft – The German Society for Translation and Interpreting – DGUD is a scientific society which aims to promote young scientists in the translation and interpreting fields. Membership applications are all processed by the membership board, and applicants must have appropriate academic qualifications and follow them up with a written request.

QSD – Qualitätssprachendienste Deutschlands – Qualitätssprachendienste Deutschlands was founded in 1993 and its main goals are ensuring the quality of the translation services, as well as shaping young professionals in the field. Because it is one of the most important translation associations in Europe, membership offers a wide range of advantages: from creating a network to constant improvement through seminars and conferences.

VDÜ – Verband deutschsprachiger Übersetzer literarischer und wissenschaftlicher Werke e.V. – The VDÜ has been representing the interests of literary translators since 1954 and has been providing its members with information, training , advice and support. The association is also a member of FIT and CEATL. To become a member of the VdÜ you need to have had a literary translation published. If you do not meet the criteria, but you are interested (whether you are a student or workin a related profession), you may apply for candidate status. While you’d enjoy the same rights and obligations as full members, you will not have the right to vote and you will not be included in the Directory of translators. Also, candidate status is limited to 2 years.

VKD – Verband der Konferenzdolmetscher im BDÜ e.V. – VKD is a professional association dedicated to conference interpreters and its main purpose is ensuring the quality of the interpretation services.

VÜD – Verband der Übersetzer und Dolmetscher e.V. – The Association of Translators and Interpreters was established in 1990 and unites almost 160 professionally experienced members. Since 1994, VÜD is a member of the International Association of Translators (FIT). Members must meet specific criteria for admission and are on a strict ethical and professional code. Translations are provided from and to over 35 different languages.

PEM – Panhellenic Association of Translators – The Panhellenic Association of Translators was founded in 1963 in Thessaloniki and is the oldest professional association in the field of Greek translation and a member of the International Federation of Translators (FIT). Membership requires either a university diploma in translation or a connected discipline, translation experience in a EU body or more than 4 years of work experience as a translator.

MEGY – Magyar Mufordítók Egyesülete – The Hungarian Translators’ Association is made up of more than 150 certified members. Those who wish to apply for membership must submit their CV, along with a list of publications and at least one recommendation letter from a recognised translator and they must pay a yearly fee. The association was established in 2007 and it is the first of its kind in Hungary. It aims to change the labour market of translators in Hungary, connect professionals in the field and offer legal assistance when necessary.

AHTI – Association of Hungarian Translators and Interpreters – Members of the Association of Hungarian Translators and Interpreters either have a University Degree in the languages of their expertise or have gained knowledge by living in the respective country. Besides proving proficiency in their languages of choice, membership candidates have to have the recommendation of two members of the association.

ITA – Indian Translators Association – Indian Translators Association is a non-profit organisation for translators and interpreters recognised by FIT (Federation Internationale des Traducteurs). Currently, the association is comprised of 100 members and its main goal is ensuring regional and national organisation of seminars and workshops for professionals.

HPI – Himpunan Penerjemah Indonesia – The Association of Indonesian Translators and Interpreters offers translations to and from over 40 languages. Established in 1974, it was initially dedicated to literary translators, but later it has grown to include all translators and interpreters. It is a member of FIT. There are three membership types: Junior member (no special requirements), Full member (has translated at least 100 pages or is a sworn translator or has worked for a minimum of 1 year in the field; for interpreters a minimum of 40 hours is required) and Honorary member.

Iraqi Translators Association – The Iraqi Translators Association, with its headquarters in Baghdad, has been registered with the Ministry of Education and Research since 1982 and joined the International Federation of Translators (FIT) in 1990. Nearly 15,000 members are registered in the association and any new member must hold a diploma in a translation-related field from a University recognised by the Ministry of Education. The association is currently seeking to issue a law in order to protect its members’ interests.

ITIA – The Irish Translators’ and Interpreters’ Association – The Irish Translators’ and Interpreters’ Association was created in 1986 and it is the only professional association of its kind in Ireland. There are 6 types of membership: Honorary, Professional (awarded based on qualifications and experience), Associate, Student, Corporate and Institutional (which are approved by the membership secretary). Its members are involved in various fields of specialisation (such as literary, technical, medical, conference interpretation, community interpretation and so on).

ITA – Israel Translators Association – The Israel Translators Association is the country’s only professional organisation, which brings together translators and language professionals. They provide translations to and from 173 different languages. A member can hold one of three different types of membership: regular, senior (for those aged over 60) and student membership.

AIDAC – Italian Association of Audiovisual Script Translators and Adaptors – The AIDAC is unique in Italy, and since 1976 it brings together all adaptors of audiovisual motion pictures. Currently it unites more than 150 members and welcomes any new applicants, who have to submit an official request for membership.

AITI – Italian Association of Translators and Interpreters – A non-profit organisation, the Italian Association of Translators and interpreters was founded in 1950, being among the first of its kind, and brings together over 800 members. Admission is based on qualification documents and professional experience and must pass a sustainability test that simulates regular working conditions. AITI is a founding member of the International Federation of Translators (FIT). Applicants are accepted as ordinary members after passing an examination. Its members provide translations to and from over 140 languages.

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Sicilia

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Lazio

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Liguria

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Lombardia

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Marche

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Piemonte-Valle d’Aosta

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Toscana

Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti sezione Veneto Trentino Alto Adige

ASSITIG – Associazione Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti Giudiziari – The Italian Association of Legal Interpreters and Translators – AssITIG was first formed in Syracuse in 2010. The main purpose of the association is to promote professionalism among translators, and to provide fair representation in the justice system of those who are unable to speak and understand Italian. AssITIG members are bound by a code of ethics and professional responsibility. Members fall into one of the following categories: ordinary members (legal translators, court interpreters, transcriptions), practitioners supporting members and honorary members. Different requirements are implemented for the different categories, but members require a language certificate, work experience and/or a university degree.

ANIMU – Associazione Nazionale degli Interpreti di Lingua dei Segni Italiana – Founded in 1987, the National Association of Italian Sign Language Interpreters is an official member of the European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters (EFSLI) since 1996. To become a member ANIMU, each applicant must take a test with a committee appointed by the association, and must hold a high school diploma and certificates of sign language courses.

ANITI – Associazione Nazionale Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti – Formerly known as S.N.I.T.I, Associazione Nazionale Italiana Traduttori e Interpreti (The National Italian Association of Translators and Interpreters) was created in 1956 and its main purpose is that of protecting translation and interpretation professionals and ensuring the promotion of legislative regulations for them. The association not only encourages its members to constantly improve themselves, but also offers a work placement trainee programme for young aspiring professionals.

ANTIMI – Associazione Nazionale dei Traduttori e degli Interpreti del Ministero dell’Interno – The National Association of Translators and Interpreters of the Ministry of Interior is a non-profit organisation that has existed since 2002 which aims to protect the personnel working in fields related to language in the Civil Administration of the Ministry. All applicants must submit their application through the National Secretariat.

ASSOINTERPRETI – Italian Association of Conference Interpreters – This body reunites professional simultaneous and consecutive interpreters from Italy. All its members must have undergone specialist training and they all abide by the association’s code of good practice.

C.I.L.I.S – Cooperativa Interpreti di Lingua dei Segni Italiana – CILIS (The Italian Sign Language Interpreters’ Co-operative) is a national organisation formed exclusively by interpreters for the deaf. The Cooperative aims to provide courses of sign language to school employees, members benefit from trainings, seminars and courses delivered in collaboration with ANIMU.

STRADE – Sindacato dei traduttori editoriali – STRADE (Editorial Translators’ Union) is a non-profit organisation founded in early 2012 and is a member of CEATL (Conseil Européen des Associations de Traducteurs Littéraires). Members of STRADE fall into one of two categories: ordinary members (any translator who works under the rules of copyright) or associates (those who do not have the necessary requirements to be admitted as members). Both associates and ordinary members pay a yearly fee, which differs for each category.

LDÜ-UPT – Landesverband der Übersetzer – Unione provinciale traduttori – The Regional Association of Translators (LDU) was founded in Bolzano in 1991 and is dedicated to language professionals residing in South Tyrol. The association aims to provide education in the language sector and ensure better working conditions for members by promoting solidarity. Membership in the association requires a relevant university degree; those who do not qualify have the option of being admitted as junior members of the association. The association provides translation from 8 languages (English, Italian, German, French, Spanish, Greek, Russian and Dutch).

JAT – Japan Association of Translators – The Japan Association of Translators was born in May 1985 with the purpose of helping individual translators gain knowledge, find out more information and create a professional network. In 2001, the association was incorporated as a non-profit organisation and it currently has over 540 members from all around the world. Membership is open only to individuals who provide translation/ interpretation services in the English and in the Japanese languages.

JTF – Japan Translation Federation – The Japan Translation Federation was created in 1981 and in September 1990 it was authorised by the Japanese Government as a public-interest corporation. Membership is of 3 types: Corporate, Supporting and Individual.

Korean Society of Translators – This non-profit organisation is a member of FIT. There are five types of membership, each with specific requirements. Members also pay a yearly fee and have to follow a Code of Ethics.

Lithuanian Association of Literary Translators – The Lithuanian Association of Literary Translators was created in 2004 and it currently has over 100 members. Membership is open to Lithuanian translators specialised in literature and humanities and who have published at least 2 books, at least 2 plays produced by theatre companies or at least 6 works of poetry. Associate membership is open to novice translators who have published one book, one play or a significant number of translations in periodicals.

ATIMAC – Asociación de Traductores e Intérpretes de Monterrey – Monterrey Translators & Interpreters Association was created in 1982 and its goal is to ensure the improvement and status of its members. Membership is open to Mexican citizens who can provide 2 recommendation letters from clients or members of the ATIMAC.

OMT – Organización Mexicana de Traductores – With its headquarters in Guadalajara, the Mexican Organisation of Translators was first established in 1992 with the purpose of promoting and supporting professional translators and interpreters. The organisation benefits from international recognition, through its different memberships; among them is the International Federation of Translators (FIT). Applicants are required to have a certificate of studies in the language field, training and experience as a translator; members pay a yearly fee.

Asociatia Traducatorilor Profesionisti din Moldova – Association of Professional Translators of Moldova – The Association of Professional Translators of Moldova (ATP) is an organisation founded in 1998, with the role to promote the highest quality language services in the Republic of Moldova.

ATAJ – Association des Traducteurs Agréés près les Juridictions – The Association of Court Translators is an association accredited by the Ministry of Justice as required by law. There are three types of memberships: active members (approved court translators), honorary members (people who have made significant impact in the field of translations) and associate members (individuals or organisations who work in or are related to the field of translations).

NBTG – Dutch Association of Sign Language Interpreters – The Dutch Association of Sign Language Interpreters (NBTG) represents the interests of sign language interpreters in the Netherlands and aims to further professional development for its members. The objectives of NBTG are: promoting the quality of sign language interpreters, increasing training opportunities for interpreters, increasing knowledge about the function of the sign language interpreter and promoting the social recognition of sign language interpreters as professionals.

NGTV – Nederlands Genootschap van Tolken en Vertalers – Dutch Association of Interpreters and Translators – With almost 1,500 members, the Dutch Association of Interpreters and Translators is the largest professional network of translators in the Netherlands and has specialists in virtually all languages and disciplines. Membership is open to individuals who work as a translator and interpreter, as a main or secondary profession, who meet the quality standards set by the association and who undertake the rules. There are two types of membership: full members and candidate members; those who apply for full membership must meet one of the following criteria: a bachelor in translation or interpretation, at least 2 years of work experience or to be a member of an international organisation of translators.

SIGV – Court Interpreters and Legal Translators – The SIGV Court Interpreters and Legal Translators are the only interpreters and translators in the Netherlands especially trained to perform this kind of work. The main goal of the organisation is to further the interests of its members and to promote their services. Court interpreters offer services in 28 languages and legal translators in 13. Membership is only open to people with a diploma from the Institute of Court Interpreters and Translators (SIGV).

VSenV – Dutch Association of Writers and Translators – The history of the Dutch Association of Writers and Translators goes back to 1905 when it as first created as an association limited to the literary field. Later on, in 1998, it was reorganised, including The Network of Screenwriters and the Freelancers Association. Its members are writers (novelists, screenwriters, poets, etc.) and literary translators.

VZV – Dutch Association of Freelance Professional Translators – The Association of Freelance Professional Translators (VZV) was created in 1990 with the purpose of protecting the interests of the Dutch freelance translators. Candidates for membership have to prove they are proficient in their language of choice, as well as in their field of specialisation. Membership offers a wide range of benefits, including online support and periodical meetings.

NZSTI – New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters – NZSTI is a national association which represents the rights of the professional translators and interpreters and promotes continuous learning and high quality services. Membership is of 6 types: Ordinary Membership (for the ones that are most highly qualified), Affiliate Membership (usually, those who have taken part-time training translation courses), Observer Membership (for those who show interest in the association, but do not meet the requirements to fully join it), Fellow Membership, Retired Membership and Honorary Membership (all three offered by the NZSTI National Council).

NAVIO – The Norwegian Audiovisual Translators Association – The Norwegian Audiovisual Translators Association started out in 1997 with 31 members. The purpose of the association is to bring together translators working in audiovisual media, to attend to members’ economic interests and to work for the recognition of that social group. Anyone who works with translation in audiovisual media can become a member of the association.

NFF – The Norwegian Non-fiction Writers and Translators Association – The Norwegian Non-fiction Writers and Translators Association is an organisation which aims at representing and protecting the rights of its approximately 5,400 members (authors and translators of non-fiction literature). NFF also offers scholarships for the same category of professionals. Membership is open to those who have published at least 100 pages of non-fiction literature.

NO – Norwegian Association of Literary Translators – The Norwegian Association of Literary Translators is a very active organisation that not only promotes and protects the rights of the Norwegian translators, but also organises seminars and workshops (both for its members and for the open public). Each year, NO awards the Bastian prizes for translations. In November 2011, the association had 308 members who translated to and from Norwegian in 48 languages. Membership is open to all literary translators of the Norwegian and Sami languages living either in Norway or abroad. To apply, candidates must submit 2 published translations (fiction, drama or poetry) along with the originals.

The Association of Government Authorized Translators in Norway – The Association of Government Authorized Translators in Norway (STF) was founded in 1913 and all members have passed a very rigorous written test from/into Norwegian in order to be recognised by the Norwegian government and to be able to stamp their translations as certified. Some of the members are also interpreters (conference or court). STF is also a member of FIT.

ATPP – Peruvian Association of Professional Translators – The Peruvian Association of Professional Translators was created in 1992 to promote the benefits of both the translators and their clients. ATPP is affiliated with the American Translators Association and with the International Federation of Translators. Membership is open only to translators who have professed for more than 10 years.

CTP – Colegio de Traductores del Perú – The Translators’ Association of Peru (also a member of FIT and ATA) is an autonomous institution of law established in 1996 which brings together individuals who hold a diploma in translation or interpretation. It is committed to upgrading and refining their colleges in order to encourage professional growth and research. Members are either ordinary, honorary or decorated members. The association currently has over 550 ordinary members, 7 honorary members and over 30 members awarded with St Jerome’s medal (for people with over 20 years’ experience in the field).

STP – Polish Society of Literary Translators – The Association of Polish Translators and Interpreters (APTI) is the oldest organisation of this kind in Poland and the only one open to linguists in all fields (technical and literary translators, interpreters etc.). Those who do not qualify for membership can join the Young Translators and Interpreters’ Club.

TEPIS – Polish Society of Sworn and Specialised Translators – The Polish Society of Sworn and Specialised Translators was founded in 1990 and it has 2 main goals: to represent the rights of the Polish translators and to ensure continuing education for them. Up to the moment, the association has organised 27 national seminars and 6 international ones, at which approximately 650 papers were delivered. It includes around 1,000 members (mostly sworn translators who work with a large number of languages) and it is itself a member of IFT.

APTRAD – Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters – Founded in early 2015 by a group of freelance translators (two of whom I had the honour to meet in person), this association has a great and aptly chosen motto: Interpreting the present to translate the future.

If you are a translator or interpreter working with Portuguese, this is a great choice. The admission criteria for members are:

  • Undergraduate or Master’s degree in Translation or Interpreting or
  • Undergraduate or Master’s degree in a different area + 2 years’ experience in the field of translation or interpreting or
  • 5 years’ experience in the field of translation or interpreting

APT – Portuguese Association of Translators – The Portuguese Association of Translators was founded in 1998 and currently it is a member of the CEATL (the European Council of Associations of Literary Translators) and of the AIETI (the Iberic Association of Translation and Interpretation Studies).

ATILGP – Associação de Tradutores e Intérpretes de Língua Gestual Portuguesa – The Association of Translators and Sign Language Interpreters in English is a non-profit organisation founded in 2007. The purpose of the association is to create the connection between the deaf, media and society.

Asociatia Traducatorilor din România (ATR) – Romanian Translators Association – ATR is an association dedicated to professional translators and interpreters in Romania. It is member FIT and has as purpose to promote high standards in the profession. Translators and interpreters (part-time or full-time), as well as higher education teachers who teach translation and interpreting can become full members, while students can opt to become junior members (limited to 3 years).

UNTAR – Uniunea Nationala a Traducatorilor Autorizati din Romania – UNTAR is a non-governmental organisation aiming to become a professional organisation of the authorised Romanian translators and interpreters. Other activities of the organisation include advocating for the rights of the translators, for the recognition of the authorised translation profession as a stand-alone profession and organising conferences and debates related to Translation Studies. Membership is open to all Romanian translators authorised by the Romanian Government. Translators who have not been officially authorised may apply for Associate Membership as long as they can prove their status with a Romanian University Diploma or with other International Diplomas.

The National League of Translators (Russia) – The National League of Translators (Russia) was created in 2004 in Moscow with the purpose of ensuring the high quality provided by the freelance Russian translators’ services. Membership is open to experienced and skilled Russian translators and interpreters (consecutive or simultaneous) who commit to quality, cooperation and continuous education.

Union of Translators of Russia – The Russian Translators’ Union is an all-Russian creative organisation that brings together practitioners and theorists who work in the field of translation, translation teachers, or language practitioners from academic communities. Membership requests must contain a professional resumé, a list of publications, proof of professional activity and recommendations; applications are approved by the general secretariat and members pay a yearly fee, as well as an entrance fee.

Union of Translators of Russia – Moldavia Branch

Union of Translators of Russia – Saint Petersburg Branch

Union of Translators of Russia – Sverdlovsk Region Branch

UKPS/ALTS – Association of Literary Translators of Serbia –  The Association of Literary Translators of Serbia reunites over 350 members. The admission criteria are strict, most members having a relevant degree and many of them an MA or even PhD in languages and working as university professors.

JTP – Union of Interpreters and Translators – Created in 1990, the Union of Interpreters and Translators (JTP) is both a representative of the Slovak translators and interpreters and an advocate of continuing education. They provide their members with numerous sources of information, both in printed and electronic forms (journals, dictionaries, newsletters, etc.)

LIC – Literarne Informacne centrum (Slovakia) – The Centre for Information on Literature was created by the Ministry of Culture of the Slovak Republic with the purpose of bringing forward and organising informational support for Slovak writers and translators. Some of the most important duties of this organisation are the promotion of Slovak literature abroad and to provide scholarships and grants for Slovak translators, scholars and linguists who show interest in the Slovak language.

SAPT -The Slovak Association of Translators and Interpreters – SAPT brings together professional translators and interpreters and among their members are interpreters accredited by European institutions and translators working for the highest authorities of the State. Criteria for admission are: a degree of higher education, professional qualifications, recommendations from existing members and compliance with the organisation’s code of ethics. The association has over 100 members who provide translations and interpretations to and from 16 different languages.

Association of Sworn Court Interpreters and Legal Translators of Slovenia – Association of Sworn Court Interpreters and Legal Translators of Slovenia was founded in early 2012 and the number of members is steadily growing. Membership is open to all legal translators and interpreters, who can apply by sending their CV demonstrating their citizenship, qualifications and experience (date of being appointed as a legal interpreter) and an application form.

DSKP – Slovenian Association of Literary Translators – Known as the Association of Translators of Slovenia and founded in 1953, the Slovenian Association of Literary Translators aims to maintain the high quality of translations and to ensure communication between translators by organising literary seminars and conferences and by promoting international student exchanges. The society has almost 250 members who provide translations to and from 43 languages.

DZTPS – Association of Scientific and Technical Translators of Slovenia – The Association of Scientific and Technical Translators of Slovenia is a professional union (member of FIT) consisting of approximately 500 members. The number of languages they translate to/ from is very large and it includes Hebrew, Japanese, Nepali, Arabic and the most important European languages. The number of fields in which these translators work is very large as well and they include technical, scientific and legal translations.

SATI – South African Translators’ Institute – The South African Translators’ Institute has been created over 50 years ago and it is the only institution that can offer professional accreditation in South Africa. Membership is open to all professionals dealing with language (translators, interpreters, proofreaders, terminologists, copywriters, etc.) SATI is a reliable source of information for those who want to become translators/ interpreters, and although the profession itself is not yet regulated in South Africa, this institute aims at encouraging high quality services of its members.

ACEtt – Spanish Literary Translators Association – ACE Translators was established in 1983 with the primary goal of defending the interests and rights, legal, economic or otherwise, of all book translators; a secondary goal is to promote any activities that lead to the improvement of social and professional status of translators. Its members translate to and from 48 languages. Membership requires the translation of at least two books (or equivalent in texts) to Castilian, Catalan, Basque or Galician and pay a membership fee; those who do not qualify, however, may still submit an application which will be reviewed nonetheless.

AGPTI – Asociación Galega de Profesionais da Traducción e da Interpretación – The Galician Association of Professional Translation and Interpretation (AGPTI) aims to establish a platform for professionals in translation and interpretation working in Galicia. The association provides translations to and from 14 languages and membership is of three types: full membership (those who practice translation as a profession), student membership and special membership. Among the goals of the association is to improve working conditions of translators and interpreters.

AICE – Spanish Association of Conference Interpreters – AICE (Association of Conference Interpreters of Spain) is a non-profit professional organisation founded in 1968 specialising in conference interpreting in international events and meetings. They bring together a team of almost 80 professionals working with the major languages in the European Union, as well as others, such as Chinese, Russian and Japanese. AICE offers expertise in various fields, professional ethics and global consulting. In total, they offer services in 23 different languages. Applicants must have professional experience as interpreters and must undertake a trial period, at the end of which their membership status is decided.

APETI – Asociación Profesional Española de Traductores e Intérpretes – Founded in 1954, APETI stands for the Spanish Professional Association of Translators and Interpreters; it is a professional body of translators and interpreters in Spain and it’s one of the first of its kind.

ASATI – Asociación Aragonesa de Traductores e Intérpretes – ASATI is a non-profit organisation that aims to bring together all resident translators and interpreters from Aragon or those who are linked to the area for any reason and to represent them in instances such as legal proceedings. Almost anyone who is linked to the translation and interpretation of languages in the region of Aragon is qualified to become a member. There are two membership categories: professional and senior partners; the members translate to and from 14 languages.

ASETRAD – Asociación Española de Traductores, Correctores e Intérpretes – The Spanish Association of Translators, Copy-editors and Interpreters (Asociación Española de Traductores, Correctores e Intérpretes) was born in 2003 out of the need to protect translation, interpretation and copy-editing professionals. ASETRAD is an active member of FIT and it has organised numerous activities meant to educate and inform its members.

APTIC – Associació Professional de Traductors i Intèrprets de Catalunya – Created in January 2009, the Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters of Catalonia is a non-profit organisation which aims at representing the rights of its members, at facilitating their information, as well as at organising activities for the public. Membership is open to translators and interpreters with an academic background (or to those with proven experience in their field).

ATIJC – Association of Sworn Translators and Interpreters of Catalonia – Founded initially only for people who work in Catalonia, in 1992, the Association of Sworn Translators and Interpreters of Catalonia now admits members from all regions. Translations are provided in and from over 14 languages. The association aims to provide representation, management, promotion and defence of the common interests of professional translators and interpreters, ensuring the ethical practice of the profession, as well as the promotion and encouragement of education, activities and work related to translation and interpretation in the field of administration of justice.

ATRAE – Asociación de Traducción y Adaptación Audiovisual de España – The Spanish Association of Audiovisual Translation and Localisation was created with the purpose of ensuring that the needs and interests of audiovisual translators and localisers are well met, to protect the rights of its members, collectively or individually, and to provide training to professionals and newcomers. Newcomers can join the association either as a full member or an associate member (students, people in professions related to the field) by filing a form and paying a yearly fee. Members benefit from courses, trainings and workshops.

EIZIE – Association of Translators, Correctors and Interpreters of Basque Language – The Association of Translators, Correctors and Interpreters of Basque Language was created in 1987 and it is dedicated to those interested in translating to/from the Basque language. The organisation encourages the information exchange among its members and gives legal advice for them. Membership is open to those who can meet certain professional requirements (translation/ interpretation studies, 2 translated/ published books in Basque and a minimum of 1 year’s experience as a full-time translators of the Basque language or a minimum of 50 hours worked as an interpreter of the same language) or certain linguistic requirements (official certificate or proof that the candidate has translated a minimum of 20 pages from/ to Basque).

XARSATIV – Red de traductores e intérpretes de la Comunidad Valenciana – An independent and non-profit organisation, the Network of Translators and Interpreters in Valencia was founded with the purpose of defending the general interests of translators and interpreters from the Valencian community. Applicants may be accepted in the organisation as a full or associate member; while full members must hold a bachelor’s degree in a relevant field or have work experience as a translator/interpreter for at least five years, associate members need only comply with the rules and standards of the organisation. The association offers translation and interpretation in 20 different languages.

SELTA – The Swedish-English Literary Translators’ Association – The Swedish-English Literary Translators’ Association was created in 1982 and it acts both as a pressure group and as an organiser of information sources for Swedish and Finnish-Swedish translators who work with the English language. There are 2 types of membership: Full and Associate and those interested can find out more by e-mailing the association.

SFÖ – The Swedish Association of Professional Translators – Founded in 1990, SFÖ – The Swedish Association of Professional Translators is Sweden’s largest organisation for technical and specialised translators, with nearly 30 corporate members and over 1,100 individual members who offer services in almost 50 different languages. Membership in the association is of five types, each with different entry requirements and fees: qualified membership, associate membership, student membership, corporate membership and subscriber membership. Members have access to legal consultancy, can attend the annual SFO conference, feature in the search database and benefit from reduces fees for some resources.

SFF – The Swedish Writers’ Union – Born in 1893, the Swedish Writers’ Union was initially open to all writers, but later on, in the 1930s translators and non-fiction writers were eliminated from the eligibility list (which led to the creation of other separate associations over the next 2 decades). Ever since, SFF protects the moral and the economic interests of its members. Also, the association aims at promoting culture and opening it for the public.

AETI – Association des Etudiants en Traduction et Interprétation, Genève – The Association of Students in Translation and Interpreting in Geneva represents the interests of nearly 400 students at university and non-university level. One of the main purposes of this association is to promote exchanges between students of different languages, backgrounds, and cultures. Membership is open to all students of Translation and Interpretation and it is voluntary. Its headquarters are in Geneva.

AIT – Association d’Interprètes et de Traducteurs, Genève – The Association of Interpreters and Translators is formed of graduates of the School of Translation and Interpretation of the University of Geneva and it was founded in 1945. It currently has more than 100 professional translators and interpreters as members who offer translations in almost 20 languages.

ASTJ – Association Suisse des Traducteurs-Jurés – An organisation formed only of sworn translators, with official recognition from the state. The Swiss Association of Sworn Translator was established in 1995 with the objective to unite sworn translators and defend their common interests and to encourage hiring of sworn translator in the society. These highly qualified members provide translation to and from 27 languages and abide to a very strict code of ethics.

ASTTI – Swiss Association of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters – Founded in 1966, with over 400 members who speak over 30 languages between them, the Swiss Association of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters promotes all professional, economic, legal and social interests of its members and encourages ongoing training and professional qualification of its members. To become a member, you first have to choose from one of the membership categories: active member (any translators residing in Switzerland or with Swiss nationality), associate member (trainees and students), passive members (people who are no longer active in the profession but wish to stay in touch), honorary members (those who have distinguished themselves through contributions and services) and supporting members (companies).

CTL – Centre de Traduction Littéraire de l’Université de Lausanne – The Centre for Literary Translation of the University of Lausanne was established in 1989 with the goal of providing a platform for the discussion of theoretical and practical problems of literary translation. Membership is open to literary translators or trainees residing in Switzerland and who have had at least one literary translation published by a recognised publisher. Members offer literary translations to and from over 75 languages or dialects.

INTERPRET – Association Suisse pour l’interprétation Communautaire et la Médiation Culturelle – The Swiss Association for Intercultural Interpretation and Mediation is the national association for interpretation and mediation that tries to bring together and represent all relevant stakeholders. Founded in 1999, it maintains a national centre of excellence in Bern and a qualification spot in Ticino. Members of the association are either individual or collective (companies and institutions). Translations and interpretations are offered in 66 languages and dialects.

VZGDÜ – Verband der Zürcher Gerichtsdolmetscher und -Übersetzer – The Association for Court Interpreters and Translators from Zurich is the first and oldest professional association of its kind in Switzerland. If you are a registered member in the official registry of interpreters of the Supreme Court of Zurich, membership is basically guaranteed after filling in a simple form. Members have many benefits, including special trainings, legal representation and featuring in the association’s searchable database. Translations and interpretations are offered in nearly 100 different languages.

TAAT – Translation & Attestation Association of Taipei – TAAT aimt to act as an intermediary between its members and the government, to support professional development of its members anto to promote translation and interpreting professionals.

Association of Translation – A member of the International Federation of Translators (FIT), the Association of Translation accepts members who are active in the field of translation professioanlly: graduates of translation-related studies, interpreters, proofreaders, etc. With over 10 years of experience, the association offers many advantages to its members, including FIT membership, job opportunities and the option to join as a candidate member for students and trainees.

TKTD – Conference Interpreters Association – Conference Interpreters Association was created in 1969 and at first it consisted of 20 members only. Later on, in 1998, their membership broadened and in 2010 the Turkish Ministry of Interior approved of their new name – Conference Interpreters Association of Turkey (which grants the legitimacy of the association). Its members provide simultaneous, bilateral, consecutive and whispered interpretation services into the most important European languages (English, Russian, German, Italian, Spanish and French). Membership applications are examined by the Admission Committee (5 members, elected for 3 years by the General Assembly).

Literary Translators Society – CEVBIR (the Literary Translators’ Society) first began in 2003 and was officially established as an association in 2006. Each membership application is evaluated by a board and a common decision is made; each member pays an entrance fee and a monthly fee afterwards.

TÜCED – Turkish Translator’s Association – The association was established in 1992, under the leadership of Ahmet Varol. The goal of the association is to create liaisons between professionals in the field and strengthen the connection between them. There are 8 different types of membership, each with their own set of requirements and fees.

UTA – Ukrainian Translators Association – Born in 1999, the Ukrainian Translators Association provides legal and technical information for both Ukrainian translators and their clients. In addition to maintaining the high standards offered by its members and to representing their rights, the association also provides official translations/ interpretation certificates. There are 2 types of membership available within the association: Individual Membership and Collective Membership. Also, there are 3 types of membership status: Independent Member (for individuals or collective members who are not professional translators/ interpreters, but who show interest in the association’s activities), Associated Member (for those who are professional translators/ interpreters but do not enjoy full membership rights) and Full Member (for individuals or collective members who are professional translators/ interpreters and who have legal accreditation for their activity).

CIoL – The Chartered Institute of Linguists – Ever since its foundation in 1910, the Chartered Institute of Linguists has gathered more than 6,000 members (Fellows, Associate Members and Members). The Institute protects the rights of professional linguists from all over the world and it is involved in language-related issues at an international level. Membership is open to all linguists regardless of their country of residence and applications can be sent starting with the 1st of September.

ITI – The Institute of Translation and Interpreting – With more than 3,000 members, ITI is a UK association that is aimed at translation and interpreting professionals. Becoming a member is subject to strict admission criteria.

NRPSI – National Register of Public Service Interpreters – Part of the CIoL until 2011, NRPSI is now an independent body dedicated to public service interpreters. All the members listed on the register have passed the DPSI (Diploma in Public Service Interpreting) exam and are fully qualified.

TA -The Translators Association – TA represents literary translators in the UK. It was set up in 1958 and provides its members with expert advice and with the means to protect their interests. It is also part of FIT (International Federation of Translators).

APCI – The Association of Police and Court Interpreters – The purpose of the Association of Police & Court Interpreters is to raise standards in the profession. Its members are freelance interpreters who work within the Criminal Justice System.

The Association of Welsh Translators and Interpreters – The Association of Welsh Translators and Interpreters has around 140 members (translators and interpreters). Their website is in Welsh.

The National Registers of Communication Professionals working with Deaf and Deafblind People – This register is for professionals within the communication industry who work with deaf and deafblind people.

ASLI -Association of Sign Language Interpreters – This organisation, founded in 1987, aims to improve standards within the profession. Its members are sign language interpreters in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

NUPIT- National Union of Professional Interpreters and Translators – NUPIT was created in 2001 and it is part of the Unite the Union, an organisation meant to advocate for the rights of interpreters and translators. The Union fights for reasonable work conditions and payment for the services of its members. All translators, interpreters and holders of a Diploma in Public Service Interpreting or of a university degree in Translations/ Interpretation are welcome to send their application.

SUBTLE – The Subtitlers’ Association – The Subtitlers’ Association (SUBTLE), initially related to the e-group Subtitlerbase, was created in 2006 with the purpose of finding solutions to the problems met by the professional subtitlers. Also, the non-profit organisation represents the rights of its members and aims at promoting subtitling as a specialised profession. Joining the association can be done through an online application form and there are 3 types of membership: Professional Member, Student Member and Friend.

ALTA – American Literary Translators Association – Created in 1978, the American Literary Translators Association is, up to the date, the only professional association in the United States dedicated exclusively to literary translations. Besides a series of publications, ALTA also presents The National Translation Award and the Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize and awards Travel Fellowships for beginner translators. Membership offers a wide range of benefits (including, but not limited to, sources of information) and it is open to all those interested in literary translations.

ASL – American Sign Language Interpreter Network – ASL Interpreter Network was created in 2001 and it aims to provide nationally accredited sign language interpreters with a wide range of work settings. In addition to their interpretation services, the agency mentors pre-qualified interpreters.

ATA – American Translators Association – This association has an impressive number of 11,000 members from more than 90 countries (including translators, interpreters, project managers, teachers and universities). A member of FIT, the American Translators Association provides its members with a wide range of sources of information and continuous learning. In addition to that, ATA offers a certification program for translations from/ into English. Translation certificates into English include Arabic-English, German-English, Japanese-English, Russian-English and other combinations. Translation certificates from English include Chinese, Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian and so on.

AAIT – Atlanta Association of Interpreters and Translators – AAIT is the Georgia branch of ATA and the wide range of translation/ interpretation services it provides are offered by nationally and internationally accredited professionals. There are 3 types of membership: Student Membership, Regular Membership and Corporate Membership and applications can be sent online.

AATIA – Austin Area Translators and Interpreters Association – AATIA was created in 1985 and it is linked to ATA by a series of accreditation workshops. Membership benefits can be obtained by sending an application for an Associate Membership, an Active Membership or for a Business Membership.

CATI – Carolina Association of Translators & Interpreters – The Carolina Association of Translators and Interpreters is the local chapter of the ATA. There are 5 types of membership: Individual, Individual + a family member who lives at the same address, Corporate, Institutional and Student. Candidates should submit their application between the 1st of July and the 1st of November.

CHICATA – Chicago Area Translators and Interpreters Association – Created in 1987, CHICATA is an independent professional organisation for translators and interpreters. Since its foundation, the association has brought together more than 170 members who work in more than 50 languages and 120 language combinations. Membership is open to individuals only (freelance or in-house).

EPITA – El Paso Interpreters and Translators Association – El Paso Interpreters and Translators Association’s goals are both protecting and educating its members. Important topics covered by the mini-workshops organised by the association include: taxes, payment, Code of Ethics, cultural differences and skill-gaining for consecutive and simultaneous interpreters.

HITA – Hawaii Interpreters & Translators’ Association – HITA is a professional association for translators/ interpreters residing in Hawaii. Its members translate into/ from Cantonese Chinese, Chiu Chow Chinese, Mandarin Chinese, Shangainese Chinese, Ilocano Filipino, Tagalog Filipino, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swatow (South Eastern) and Vietnamese.

HITA – Houston Interpreters and Translators Association – The Houston Interpreters and Translators Association is an affiliate (not a chapter) of ATA and which shares its same values. There are 3 types of membership available: Individual, Corporate and Institutional and applications can be sent online.

IITA – Iowa Interpreters and Translators Association – The Iowa Interpreters and Translators Association is a non-profit organisation affiliated with ATA. Also, it is an organisational member of the National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators and of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Membership is of 5 types: Active (full-time translation/ interpretation professionals resident in Iowa), Associate (for those who do not meet all the requirements to become Active Members), Corresponding (for those who are not Iowa residents), Student (for those enrolled in full-time or part-time translation/ interpretation studies) and Honorary.

MATI – Midwest Association of Translators & Interpreters – The Midwest Association of Translators and Interpreters was created in 2003 as a chapter of ATA. There are 4 types of membership: Individual, Institutional, Student and Corporate.

MITA – Metroplex Interpreters and Translators Association – MITA is an association whose main goals are creating a network of translations professionals and providing them with reliable sources of information. Candidates should keep in mind that there is no onsite registration and that pre-registration is required.

NATI – Nebraska Association of Translators and Interpreters – Incorporated in 1999, the association had only 8 members in its first days. Nowadays, the number has gone up to 200 members who speak a wide variety of languages and dialects and are specialised in a large number of fields. Due to its affiliation with ATA (starting with November 2011), this association provides its members with the news and materials available to ATA members. Those interested in membership can send their applications online.

NITA – Nevada Interpreters and Translators Association – Starting with 2004, the founding group of the NITA has been active and, in 2008 the official foundation of the association took place. The Nevada Interpreters and Translators Association is affiliated with ATA and shares the same goals: informing and protecting the members, as well as providing them with continuous learning opportunities.

NMTIA – New Mexico Translators and Interpreters Association – NMTIA is a professional association which provides its members with various sources of information (newsletters, workshops, seminars, etc.) It is affiliated with ATA and those interested in becoming members can contact the association either via mail or via e-mail.

TAPIT – Tennessee Association of Professional Interpreters and Translators – The Tennessee Association of Professional Interpreters and Translators is a professional organisation that brings together interpreters and translators of spoken, written and signed languages. For those who find themselves in financial struggle, the association offers scholarships that cover the costs of attending their trainings and seminars. There are 4 types of membership (Student, Individual, Corporate and Institutional) and those interested in applying can send their forms either online or via US mail.

UTIA – Utah Translators and Interpreters Association – Affiliated with ATA, the Utah Translators and Interpreters Association’s goal is ensuring the high quality of the translation and interpretation services. In order to apply, you must submit an online form and specify your chosen type of subscription (Student, Individual or Corporate).

UMTIA – Upper Midwest Translators and Interpreters Association – As a chapter of the American Translators Association since 2004, UMTIA shares the same goals as its umbrella association. There are 4 membership levels (Individual, Institutional, Corporate or Individual Lifetime) and in order to apply, you can submit an online form.

ATA ID – Interpreters Division of the American Translators Association# – The Interpreters Division was created in 1998 and currently there are 16 Divisions within the American Translators Association, each gathering members interested in a specific professional field.

ATA MD – Medical Division of the American Translators Association – As the name suggests, the Medical Division of the American Translators Association reunites medical translators and interpreters working in 65 languages. The purpose of this division (third biggest among ATA divisions) is to promote cooperation and exchange of information among its members.

ATA TCD – American Translators Association Translation Companies Division – The American Translators Association Translation Companies Division aims at providing information for those interested in the management of a translation company. Both ATA members and non-members can apply online for membership.

CAPI – Colorado Association of Professional Interpreters – CAPI was created in 2001 and it is a non-profit organisation whose main goal is meeting the needs of the interpreters. Anyone can apply for membership via an online registration form.

CAT – Center for Art in Translation – The Center for Art in Translation is a non-profit organisation with the stated purpose of making international literature accessible to English readers through translations. Up to the moment, they have organised 3 programs: Two Lines Press (focusing on works that have not yet been translated into English), Two Voices (bilingual reading) and Poetry Inside Out (creation and translation of poetry). To get involved, you can either apply for one of their job openings or for one of their volunteering opportunities.

CCIA – The California Court Interpreters Association – Created in 1971, CCIA currently has more than 800 members, translating into and from approximately 70 languages, Those interested or involved in court interpreting are eligible for membership. To apply, you must submit an online form.

CCIO – Community and Court Interpreters of the Ohio Valley – The Community and Court Interpreters of the Ohio Valley was born in 1997 and it is nowadays organised in 3 groups, according to the geographical region: North, Central and Southwest. Membership is open to everyone interested in community, court and medical interpretation and applications can be sent online on their website.

CHIA – California Healthcare Interpreting Association – Originally named “California Healthcare Interpreters Association” in 1996 when it was first created, the association changed its name in 2003 to its current one. Members include interpreters, physicians, healthcare companies and language agencies.

CTA – Colorado Translators Association – CTA is a 100% volunteer-run non-profit organisation with more than 150 members. Membership is open to all professional linguists and language service company who adhere to the ATA Bylaws and Code of Professional Conduct and Business Practice. The application process starts with an online registration form.

DVTA – Delaware Valley Translators Association – DVTA is a non-profit organisation associated with ATA ever since the 1960s. Membership is open to active translators/ interpreters, institutions and corporations, as well as to those who show professional interest in the field of translations/ interpretations. Also, members have to be residents of Delaware, South-eastern Pennsylvania or Central/ Southern New Jersey.

ATIF – Florida Chapter of ATA – The association was established in 2009 and is open to individuals active in the translation and interpreting field. There are two categories of membership: active members (they must have one of the following: a bachelor’s or higher academic degree or certificate relevant to the T&I profession; ATA Certified or State Court Certified Interpreter; US Federal Court Certified Interpreter or NAJIT certification; membership in a member organisation of FIT ; active member of AICC (The International Association of Conference Interpreters) or TAALS (The American Association of Language Specialists) and have at least 3 years’ experience) for whom Florida residency is required or associate members (open to any individual interested in the goals and objectives of ATIF; Florida residency is not required).

MICATA – Mid-America Chapter of ATA – Entirely run by volunteers, this chapter of ATA has members located throughout the U.S. Midwest and around the world. You can join as an individual, family or corporate/institutional. Email MICATA for more information regarding membership.

MING – Medical Interpreter Network of Georgia – MING is an association that shelters and promotes high quality medical interpretation services in Georgia. Those interested in applying can do it online, on their official website.

MiTiN – Michigan Translators/Interpreters Network – MiTiN was officially established in 1995 and it currently includes more than 130 members who translate or interpret into/ from 34 languages. Membership applications can be sent online.

NAJIT – The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators – This association was created in 1978 and it promotes high quality court and legal translation and interpretation services. There are 5 membership categories (Active, Associate, Corporate, Corporate Sponsor, Organizational and Student) and the application form can be submitted online.

NCATA – National Capital Area Chapter of ATA – One of the oldest chapters of ATA, this group reunites professional translators, interpreters, language services companies, and language-related institutions. ATA membership is not required for membership in NCATA. The association also hosts ATA certification examinations twice a year.

NCIHC – National Council on Interpreting in Health Care – The National Council on Interpreting in Health Care’s foundation started in 1994 and nowadays it works at both a local and national level. There are 2 membership categories: organisational and individual and for both of them the application should be sent online.

NETA – New England Translators Association – With more than 150 members, NETA works in all the major European languages, as well as in some of the most important Asian languages. Membership form is to be sent online (on the official website).

NOTA – Northeast Ohio Translators Association – First created in 1977, NOTA started to be recognised as the second permanent ATA chapter in 1979. The association assists both translators and clients into acquiring useful information. Besides the Student, Regular, Corporate/ Institutional Memberships, NOTA also offers International Membership (a membership category not often encountered).

NOTIS – Northwest Translators and Interpreters Society – NOTIS was formed in 1988 and it is a chapter of the American Translators Association. The four categories of membership available provide with a large number of benefits and the application form is to be sent online, via the official website.

NYCT – New York Circle of Translators – Originally a small circle of friends in 1979, the New York Circle of Translators has grown into a non-profit organisation with several hundreds of members. There are 7 classes of membership: Student, Individual, Corporate, Patron (which includes the benefits of the Individual Membership and special mention in the Membership Directory), Corporate Patron, Lifetime and Honorary Lifetime. Applications can be sent online.

RID – Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf – RID was incorporated in 1972 and it is a national membership organisation. Besides advocating for high quality services, the association brings forward a series of scholarships for outstanding members.

SEMIA – South Eastern Medical Interpreters Association – The South Eastern Medical Interpreters Association is a forum for medical interpreters where they can exchange useful information.

TTIG – The Translators & Interpreters Guild – TTIG, formed in 1991 by a group of translators, is a volunteer-run organisation which stands up for the rights of its members, as well as promoting high quality services. Membership is open to individual translators (either freelance or in-house).

WITS – Washington State Court Interpreters and Translators Society – A volunteer-run organisation, the Washington State Court Interpreters and Translators Society was established in 1988. The society promotes high quality continuing education and good information of the public regarding the court interpreter/ translator profession. Those interested in the organisation can submit their application online, on their official website.

CTPU Colegio de Traductores Públicos del Uruguay (The Uruguayan Sworn Translators Association) – CTPU is a translation association in Uruguay, affiliated with FIT.

AVINC – Venezuelan Association of Conference Interpreters – AVINC was created in 1980 and one year later it was registered as a non-profit organisation. Members have to prove both their experience and their language skills, and up to the moment, the AVINC members have worked all over the world.

CONALTI – Colegio Nacional de Licenciados en Traducción e Interpretación – Born in 1980, A.C. CONALTI is the oldest association of its kind in Venezuela and it is also a member of FIT. Its members translate into/ from 19 languages and membership admissions are made through an application form which has to be sent via email.

Claiming back costs of becoming a member

Most people don’t know that they can reclaim tax on their memberships.

You can reclaim tax you pay on fees or subscriptions to some approved professional organisations – but only if you must have membership to do your job or it’s helpful for your work.